Search found 209 matches

by Bruce Taylor
Thu Oct 31, 2019 9:00 pm
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Stylonychia
Replies: 5
Views: 513

Re: Stylonychia

Very nice! This is Tetmemena pustulata . A redescription of the species, here: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/257384014_A_redescription_of_the_oxytrichid_Tetmemena_pustulata_Muller_1786_Eigner_1999_and_notes_on_morphogenesis_in_the_marine_urostylid_Metaurostylopsis_salina_Lei_et_al_2005_Ci...
by Bruce Taylor
Thu Oct 31, 2019 6:19 pm
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Amoeba
Replies: 6
Views: 618

Re: Amoeba

Terrific video. :) I'm not great with amoebae, but it seems to be a dactylopodid ( Mayorella , Korotnevella , etc.) Broad cell with conical pseudopods, nucleus has a strong nucleolus. Very nice ! Those two ciliates were trying to steal the show ! Both are heterotrophic flagellates. :D The narrower o...
by Bruce Taylor
Thu Oct 31, 2019 5:15 pm
Forum: Identification help
Topic: Big thing with waving proboscis
Replies: 2
Views: 681

Re: Big thing with waving proboscis

Its a dileptid (Dileptus, Rimaleptus, Pseudomonilicaryon, etc.). Identification to genus level would require a clear view of the macronucleus.
by Bruce Taylor
Tue Oct 29, 2019 2:24 pm
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Wait for it !
Replies: 17
Views: 1568

Re: Wait for it !

Some ciliates can jump so quickly that it looks like they're teleporting! :D
by Bruce Taylor
Tue Oct 29, 2019 11:55 am
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Wait for it !
Replies: 17
Views: 1568

Re: Wait for it !

Fun! This is the ciliate Mesodinium . What you were seeing as pseudopods are the long cirri around its "waist," and a set of specialized stiff cirri called "jumping bristles." As you can see, they work pretty well. :D I think the cirri are a bit frayed, which is why they look like they are "branchin...
by Bruce Taylor
Sun Oct 27, 2019 1:38 pm
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Lacrymaria, pluerostomatid and pretty ciliates
Replies: 10
Views: 1329

Re: Lacrymaria, pluerostomatid and pretty ciliates

Really exceptional microscopy! Lacrymaria like to hide in makeshift shelters, such as clumps of debris or old arthropod cuticles. From there, they can safely send out their extendable mouths, and gather food (if the neck gets bitten off by something, they just grow a new one). That might be why your...
by Bruce Taylor
Fri Oct 25, 2019 9:56 pm
Forum: Identification help
Topic: Species of ciliates?)
Replies: 2
Views: 875

Re: Species of ciliates?)

The first is Lembadion, second is a colepid (e.g. Coleps). The colepid is the rear part (opisthe) of a fresh division , which is why the anterior of the cell has no armour.
by Bruce Taylor
Wed Oct 23, 2019 11:45 am
Forum: Identification help
Topic: what is it?)
Replies: 4
Views: 426

Re: what is it?)

Yes, they're pretty cute. :D Yours seems to be quite a big one. Is this a marine sample, or freshwater?
by Bruce Taylor
Wed Oct 23, 2019 12:04 am
Forum: Identification help
Topic: what is it?)
Replies: 4
Views: 426

Re: what is it?)

Aspidisca, a euplotid ciliate.
by Bruce Taylor
Mon Oct 21, 2019 1:45 pm
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Stentors?
Replies: 2
Views: 444

Re: Stentors?

First one is a rotifer (I'll leave it to someone else to figure out what kind!) :D Second and third are Stentors. The third one has symbiotic algae, no cortical pigment granules and moniliform macronucleus, so is probably S. polymorphus. The second one doesn't unabmbiguously show the macronucleus, s...
by Bruce Taylor
Tue Oct 15, 2019 3:38 pm
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Stenostomum eats the ciliates
Replies: 7
Views: 714

Re: Stenostomum eats the ciliates

That was really fun to watch. I love the way this guy projects his pouchy mouth to nab those tasty ciliates.

I've seen and recorded big ciliates swallowing Stenostumum, so it's interesting to see the tables turned.
by Bruce Taylor
Fri Oct 11, 2019 12:55 pm
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Ciliate feeding frenzy
Replies: 5
Views: 746

Re: Ciliate feeding frenzy

Superb microscopy, mintakax, as usual! Opening sequence is probably Tetmemena (3 stiff caudal cirri, oblong cell, common "weed" in bacteria-rich culture). Next is Paramecium , as noted. The diminutive hypotrich we see next is likely the product of a recent division ("proter" if front end, "opisthe" ...
by Bruce Taylor
Thu Oct 10, 2019 1:54 pm
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Amoeba yeast feast
Replies: 15
Views: 1494

Re: Amoeba yeast feast

Stunning!

I believe these are Nuclearia (from a sister group to the fungi). Apart from the overall shape, which they share w/ vampyrellids, the adhering bacteria are a clue: Nuclearia typically has a mucus sheath studded with embedded bacteria, small flagellates and other debris.
by Bruce Taylor
Wed Oct 09, 2019 10:46 am
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Three Ciliates
Replies: 12
Views: 1074

Re: Three Ciliates

And after all that...I just watched the mintakax's excellent video again, and now think I'd completely misread the nature of the blue matter. I don't think it's a pigment spot, after all! :D As I should have noticed before, the stuff is circulating in the cell, and some of it has even collected in t...
by Bruce Taylor
Wed Oct 09, 2019 9:31 am
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Three Ciliates
Replies: 12
Views: 1074

Re: Three Ciliates

Just for the record, my understanding is that Synhymeniida were moved out of Nassophorea based on RNA trees like in Gong et al. , 2009 . But they note that Nassulopsis are different from the others in having polykinetids, and Sola et al. thought they actually belong with the Nassulida. Lynn left th...
by Bruce Taylor
Tue Oct 08, 2019 9:02 pm
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Three Ciliates
Replies: 12
Views: 1074

Re: Three Ciliates

...and an interesting writeup on Nassulopsis by the talented Martin Kreutz (a colour update from one of his old Mikrokosmos articles): https://mikro-tuemplerforum.at/viewtopic.php?t=438 Speaking of morphological variation...here's a fatso with three cytopharyngeal "baskets"! :D Nassulopsis from mart...
by Bruce Taylor
Tue Oct 08, 2019 8:15 pm
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Three Ciliates
Replies: 12
Views: 1074

Re: Three Ciliates

BTW, the first critter is probably Amphileptus procerus, a fairly common species.
by Bruce Taylor
Tue Oct 08, 2019 7:36 pm
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Three Ciliates
Replies: 12
Views: 1074

Re: Three Ciliates

Hi Josh, those are very good points. My thinking here was that the blue spot is pretty distinctive, so this was likely to be a compressed specimen, similar to this one posted by Michael Plewka (of Plingfactory fame): Nassulopsis2.JPG (from https://www.mikroskopie-forum.de/index.php?topic=6021.0 ) He...
by Bruce Taylor
Tue Oct 08, 2019 12:50 am
Forum: Identification help
Topic: Chilodonella?
Replies: 2
Views: 523

Re: Chilodonella?

It is a ciliate, but clearly not Chilodonella . It looks a lot like Tetrahymena, actually. I had to rewatch the video on a better monitor to see it, but the mouth is visible from around the 8 second mark, and is consistent with a hymenostome, and in the right location for Tetrahymena . The shape and...
by Bruce Taylor
Fri Oct 04, 2019 8:24 pm
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Six Ciliates from this week
Replies: 8
Views: 729

Re: Six Ciliates from this week

Beautiful! :) First is a Frontonia . It's been eating cyanobacteria, which cause entertaining bulges in its body. Second is probably Frontonia too (because of trichocysts, location of CV and diet), but this specimen looks lumpy and unwell. Third critter is ambiguous to me, because we don't see mouth...
by Bruce Taylor
Thu Sep 26, 2019 1:22 am
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Flagellates and Ciliates
Replies: 18
Views: 942

Re: Flagellates and Ciliates

mintakax wrote:
Thu Sep 26, 2019 12:10 am
Thanks Bruce-- I was pursuing Fresh-water Biology (Ward and Whipple) and thought that Urochaemia might be a possibility ?
Nope. :) These are certainly hypotrichs, and Urochaenia is an enchelyid (in a whole different subclass).
by Bruce Taylor
Wed Sep 25, 2019 11:46 pm
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Flagellates and Ciliates
Replies: 18
Views: 942

Re: Flagellates and Ciliates

Nice video and DIC. Could that long, thin protist be Spirostomum? Yes, lovely (and lively!) video. :D No, the long ciliates are not Spirostomum , but a species of vermiform hypotrich. Mobile cirri and a spirotrich-type adoral zone of membranelles are visible at times, especially around the 1:13 mar...
by Bruce Taylor
Thu Sep 19, 2019 1:55 pm
Forum: Identification help
Topic: Ciliate ID
Replies: 5
Views: 1855

Re: Ciliate ID

Really nice! This one can be identified to species level: Lembadion lucens (cell size significantly smaller than that of L. bullinum, oral aperture shorter than that of L. magnum)
by Bruce Taylor
Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:19 pm
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Litonotus sp
Replies: 7
Views: 821

Re: Litonotus sp

What is the function/purpose of their unusual swan shape? The proboscis is both a long mouth and a weapon, lined with toxic extrusomes. Litonotus can stun its prey with the toxicysts, then swallow the victim whole with that huge mouth. I wonder whether the longitudinal lines are microtubule bundles...
by Bruce Taylor
Sun Sep 01, 2019 2:21 pm
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Purple & Green Ciliate
Replies: 8
Views: 886

Re: Purple & Green Ciliate

It appears to be a species of Dysteria. What a marvellous colour!
by Bruce Taylor
Fri Aug 23, 2019 12:12 pm
Forum: Identification help
Topic: Heliozoa IDs
Replies: 2
Views: 1198

Re: Heliozoa IDs

The first is Acanthocystis turfacea . The others appear to be species of Raphidiophrys (though I am not very clever about identifying centroheliozoans!). Try to get a close look at the scales, if possible. I have some doubts about number 2, because you mention numerous vacuoles. It's possible that I...
by Bruce Taylor
Sun Aug 18, 2019 8:48 pm
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Shape-shifting flagellate
Replies: 11
Views: 954

Re: Shape-shifting flagellate

This is Peranema . If you observe the cell for a while, you'll see it glide through the water with its flagellum rigidly extended in front. As it progresses, it periodically pauses, contracts and sort of squirms in place. It can also wriggle through narrow apertures in clumps of debris. When squirmi...
by Bruce Taylor
Mon Jun 10, 2019 12:11 pm
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Dileptus sp.
Replies: 4
Views: 872

Re: Dileptus sp.

Very nice find! This guy is in the order Dileptida, but in a different family. Dileptus has small, scattered macronuclei, whereas your organism has a large, conspicuously tubular macronucleus. It seems to be a dimacrocaryonid ( Monomacrocaryon , Dimacrocaryon or Rimaleptus ). The exact shape of the ...
by Bruce Taylor
Mon Apr 01, 2019 5:03 pm
Forum: Identification help
Topic: which amoebe is this?
Replies: 6
Views: 2158

Re: which amoebe is this?

Oh, I see....very fine pseudopods, and not at all like the locomotive form of Mayorella viridis...and I'm afraid I don't know anything about their floating form!

I hope somebody who knows more about amoebae will chime in.
by Bruce Taylor
Fri Mar 29, 2019 9:11 pm
Forum: Identification help
Topic: which amoebe is this?
Replies: 6
Views: 2158

Re: which amoebe is this?

It would be nice to see it with pseudopods extended. Mayorella viridis is possible (zoochlorellae, central nucleus with conspicuous nucleolus).