Search found 268 matches

by Bruce Taylor
Sat Jul 04, 2020 1:59 pm
Forum: Identification help
Topic: ID freshwater microbes from wetlands 100x
Replies: 6
Views: 440

Re: ID freshwater microbes from wetlands 100x

dia_dd wrote:
Fri Jul 03, 2020 7:42 am
Thank you for this background information, it is very interesting! You sound very knowledgeable on microbes, do you have a science background?
Nope. My background is in poetry. :) My foreground seems to have lots of science in it, though. ;)
by Bruce Taylor
Thu Jul 02, 2020 11:50 am
Forum: Identification help
Topic: ID freshwater microbes from wetlands 100x
Replies: 6
Views: 440

Re: ID freshwater microbes from wetlands 100x

Wow, thank you so much! What is a little confusing is that Google is showing mostly plants for Bryophyllum. Could you by chance help me ID this microbe which I think could be Euplotes?: https://youtu.be/i54xHkDX_Pw Yup, Bryophyllum is also a succulent plant. We're stuck with overlapping systems of ...
by Bruce Taylor
Wed Jul 01, 2020 11:27 pm
Forum: Identification help
Topic: ID freshwater microbes from wetlands 100x
Replies: 6
Views: 440

Re: ID freshwater microbes from wetlands 100x

1. A very flexible hypotrich ciliate. It's probably a urostylid, but we don't see it closely enough to be sure.
2. A ciliate, probably in the genus Loxophyllum, but it could also be Bryophyllum (a closer view would be helpful)
3. A rotifer in the genus Platyias.
by Bruce Taylor
Wed Jul 01, 2020 5:00 pm
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Flagellate
Replies: 6
Views: 181

Re: Flagellate

See what you mean about the flagellum, does seem a little short and overly energetic :) I think this drawing shows the difference clearly . Yes, in locomotion peranemids hold the flagellum stiffly forward, as shown in your image. The bent tip beats and twitches, but doesn't really contribute to for...
by Bruce Taylor
Wed Jul 01, 2020 2:40 pm
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Flagellate
Replies: 6
Views: 181

Re: Flagellate

Great catch and video. looks like it might be a Peranema sp. Peranemids are "anterior gliders," which means they have a long, thick anterior flagellum, used for "gliding motility" (forward motion is produced on the surface of the flagellum, without the need for any movement). The single emergent fl...
by Bruce Taylor
Fri Jun 05, 2020 12:23 pm
Forum: Identification help
Topic: I call them bell gliders
Replies: 8
Views: 353

Re: I call them bell gliders

I think I’ve seen them in a circle cluster-heads facing in-flagella facing out- That colony-shape would be very typical of choanoflagellate clusters, such as those formed by Salpingoeca rosetta : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salpingoeca_rosetta. Dinobryon colonies are branching, like little trees ...
by Bruce Taylor
Wed Jun 03, 2020 11:51 am
Forum: Identification help
Topic: I call them bell gliders
Replies: 8
Views: 353

Re: I call them bell gliders

Rossf wrote:
Wed Jun 03, 2020 3:40 am
I think the middle flagella is longer than the other structures
That is typical of many choanoflagellates.
by Bruce Taylor
Tue Jun 02, 2020 12:26 pm
Forum: Identification help
Topic: I call them bell gliders
Replies: 8
Views: 353

Re: I call them bell gliders

I don't know of any genuinely triflagellate organisms with that shape, but there are some that can look that way because of other cellular structures. Here's a choanoflagellate in phase contrast, for example: https://www.photomacrography.net/forum/userpix/2314_Salpingoeca_artilleros0000326_1.jpg Onl...
by Bruce Taylor
Wed May 13, 2020 12:04 pm
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Gastrotrichs and Spirostomun with a Diatom
Replies: 4
Views: 425

Re: Gastrotrichs and Spirostomun with a Diatom

Interesting pictures. :) I don't see a Spirostomum , here. The ciliate in the first couple of images has cirri , and appears to be a hypotrich with anterior narrowing, such as Trachelostyla (common in saltwater). The "long-necked" organism in the fourth image is likely a litostome ciliate of some ki...
by Bruce Taylor
Sun May 10, 2020 12:22 pm
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Bacteria Rivers in the Salt Water Biome
Replies: 4
Views: 598

Re: Bacteria Rivers in the Salt Water Biome

Here's another record of the phenomenon from one of my old videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q7Kf-QahX6A Was just wondering where the predators were - to take advantage of this 'bacterial shoaling' when they appeared. So all was as it should be ... Yup. At about the 30 second mark, we see som...
by Bruce Taylor
Sun May 10, 2020 11:06 am
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Bacteria Rivers in the Salt Water Biome
Replies: 4
Views: 598

Re: Bacteria Rivers in the Salt Water Biome

I think you've recorded part of a bacterial swarm ring, a phenomenon we often see on slides. The conventional explanation is that chemical gradients form under the coverslips (differences in levels of dissolved gases, for instance), and the bacteria congregate--by aerotaxis, or chemotaxis--in the zo...
by Bruce Taylor
Fri May 08, 2020 11:04 am
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: An inquisitive ciliate
Replies: 5
Views: 759

Re: An inquisitive ciliate

Nice! Really good image quality. It's a colpodean of some kind (Colpoda, Bresslaua, etc.).
by Bruce Taylor
Tue Apr 28, 2020 10:56 am
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Micro stonemasons. Difflugia.
Replies: 21
Views: 2092

Re: Micro stonemasons. Difflugia.

Very nice! Are they building in quartz? Wonder if that is a deliberate choice (translucent house) or just available material - and yes I know they have no 'brain' :) A French group did a rather ingenious study of Difflugia 's material-selection. I wrote a blog entry about it a few years ago: https:...
by Bruce Taylor
Sun Apr 19, 2020 1:21 am
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Another ciliat from a little stream between two lakes!
Replies: 10
Views: 496

Re: Another ciliat from a little stream between two lakes!

Mouth is very important to identify prorodon complex. Mouth is important for most ciliate identifications. :) Usually, it is the first feature you should look for. Other useful characters are the arrangement of somatic cilia (or cirri, as the case may be), the shape of the macronucleus, location an...
by Bruce Taylor
Sat Apr 18, 2020 6:12 pm
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Another ciliat from a little stream between two lakes!
Replies: 10
Views: 496

Re: Another ciliat from a little stream between two lakes!

OK, I watched it. :) Again, we don't see the mouth in that video, so identification is not possible. Prorodon (= Pseudoprodon sensu Kahl), would have a mouth at the anterior pole of the cell, and a long, wormlike macronucleus . The mouth (cytostome) is supported by a palisade of cytopharyngeal rods ...
by Bruce Taylor
Sat Apr 18, 2020 1:57 pm
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Another ciliat from a little stream between two lakes!
Replies: 10
Views: 496

Re: Another ciliat from a little stream between two lakes!

Could it be a Prorodon? There's a lot of confusion about Prorodon , because most species previously included in that group actually belong in Holophrya (and were formally moved there by Wilhelm Foissner, in a paper that appeared just weeks before his death earlier this year). Prorodon as currently ...
by Bruce Taylor
Fri Apr 17, 2020 12:06 pm
Forum: Identification help
Topic: Paramecium busaria, Frontonia, or other?
Replies: 7
Views: 586

Re: Paramecium busaria, Frontonia, or other?

Numanoid wrote:
Thu Apr 16, 2020 3:05 am
It was quite cool seeing cytopharyngeal basket after you mentioned it. I thought it was some kind of focusing or texture artifact. It's a good reminder to vary focus of a subject while observing it.
Taxonomy makes hidden things visible. :)
by Bruce Taylor
Wed Apr 15, 2020 11:27 pm
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Close-up of ciliates from a little pond close to the sea.
Replies: 15
Views: 461

Re: Close-up of ciliates from a little pond close to the sea.

Really nice quality! :)

This isn't Paramecium, but a species in the Stylonychia mytilus complex.
by Bruce Taylor
Wed Apr 15, 2020 12:53 pm
Forum: Identification help
Topic: Paramecium busaria, Frontonia, or other?
Replies: 7
Views: 586

Re: Paramecium busaria, Frontonia, or other?

Further to the above, here's a labelled still from your video, showing the cytopharyngeal basket: Furgasonia.JPG And here's a pic from an article on Furgasonia blochmanni (note the trichocysts, all around the outside of the cell, and the centrally-located contractile vacuole): Furgasonia blochmanni....
by Bruce Taylor
Tue Apr 14, 2020 9:28 pm
Forum: Identification help
Topic: Paramecium busaria, Frontonia, or other?
Replies: 7
Views: 586

Re: Paramecium busaria, Frontonia, or other?

Because of the cell's shape (rather Frontonia -like!), I think it is likely to be Furgasonia blochmanni , described in 1967 as Cyclogramma blochmanni : https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/j.1550-7408.1967.tb02027.x?casa_token=KyrUjdSEOrsAAAAA:8yRdWDgYJ_BPdQIW7YQkVMZKLHXTddwHnO7Ech8ibCpbq...
by Bruce Taylor
Tue Apr 14, 2020 4:07 am
Forum: Identification help
Topic: Paramecium busaria, Frontonia, or other?
Replies: 7
Views: 586

Re: Paramecium busaria, Frontonia, or other?

It is neither Paramecium nor Frontonia . At a few points--most clearly, at 0:32--we see an oral structure called the "cytopharyngeal basket" on the side of the cell, in the anterior (a structure of rigid microtubules, useful for eating cyanobacteria). That puts your ciliate in the order Nassulida. I...
by Bruce Taylor
Sun Apr 12, 2020 12:00 pm
Forum: Identification help
Topic: Sessile Rotifers?
Replies: 9
Views: 813

Re: Sessile Rotifers?

The terminology can be baffling. :D Yes, "peristome" is a handy word for the whole area around the mouth. I don't think a "peak" in the oral region is a diagnostic character for Scyphidia . Some sessile peritrichs do have specialized structures called "opercula" (little caps or flaps, which can be r...
by Bruce Taylor
Thu Apr 09, 2020 3:37 am
Forum: Identification help
Topic: Sessile Rotifers?
Replies: 9
Views: 813

Re: Sessile Rotifers?

To identify your critters to family level, you'd begin by determining whether they have a stalk, or adhere to their host by means of an organelle called a "scopula." If the former, they are in Epistylidae; if the latter, Scyphidiidae. To get down to genus, after that, it might be necessary to rule o...
by Bruce Taylor
Wed Apr 08, 2020 4:42 pm
Forum: Identification help
Topic: Sessile Rotifers?
Replies: 9
Views: 813

Re: Sessile Rotifers?

sinabro wrote:
Wed Apr 08, 2020 4:38 am
I am always surprised by your knowledge. Thanks Bruce...
And I'm always surprised by the amazing clarity of your microscopy! (as in your videos of Haematococcus & ciliates) :)
by Bruce Taylor
Wed Apr 08, 2020 1:30 am
Forum: Identification help
Topic: Sessile Rotifers?
Replies: 9
Views: 813

Re: Sessile Rotifers?

Hi Katfisch... Good result. it's epistylis Epistylis typically has a long, clearly visible stalk. These are more likely to be Scyphidia or Rhabdostyla , both of which can be epibionts on crustaceans. The former has no stalk, the latter has a very short one. We don't clearly see how the cells are at...
by Bruce Taylor
Tue Mar 31, 2020 12:26 am
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Peritrichida
Replies: 9
Views: 668

Re: Peritrichida

Gorgeous! Really nice detail.

These are solitary vorticellids (spirally contractile stalk with sinusoidal myoneme). Identification to genus would require a very close look at the pellicle (preferably with silver stain).
by Bruce Taylor
Thu Mar 26, 2020 7:36 pm
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Dileptid Hunting and Eating
Replies: 17
Views: 3601

Re: Dileptid Hunting and Eating

Bruce, I am wondering how the amoeba population is linked to the population of other protists...What parameters are conducive to amoeba and diatom population explosions ? I'm not sure that a thousand pages would be enough to answer that question. It might require a small library. ;) Diatoms are a l...
by Bruce Taylor
Thu Mar 26, 2020 1:58 pm
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Dileptid Hunting and Eating
Replies: 17
Views: 3601

Re: Dileptid Hunting and Eating

Yup, changes in temperatures can certainly promote blooms of particular organisms. But there are many things at play in your tanks...light levels, oxygen, water column mixing/stagnation, sulfur uptake, saprobity (amount of the organic matter in the tank that is decomposing), pH (decomposition tends ...
by Bruce Taylor
Wed Mar 25, 2020 7:18 pm
Forum: Pictures and Videos
Topic: Dileptid Hunting and Eating
Replies: 17
Views: 3601

Re: Dileptid Hunting and Eating

Dileptids readily form cysts, when environmental conditions won't support vegetative growth. If you pick healthy cells out with a micropipette and place them in a small quantity of water with no food, you can sometimes induce them to encyst. A depression slide works well, or a small petri dish. At a...
by Bruce Taylor
Wed Mar 25, 2020 12:41 pm
Forum: Identification help
Topic: Not an amoeba?
Replies: 9
Views: 3745

Re: Not an amoeba?

Very odd. I'm unaware of any ciliate (vaginicolid, metacystid, etc.) with such a complex lorica.