Cargill immersion oil "B" probably 1960s

Here you can discuss sample and specimen preparation issues.
Post Reply
Message
Author
MicroBob
Posts: 2211
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2016 9:11 am
Location: Northern Germany

Cargill immersion oil "B" probably 1960s

#1 Post by MicroBob » Mon Jun 15, 2020 6:59 pm

Hi together,

included with a 1960s Bausch&Lomb Dynazoom I got this immersion oil: Cargill immersion oil "B".
It is probably as old as the neary unused microscope and perfectly fluid. Does somebody have an idea whether it contains PCBs, like some other immersion oils did for a time?

I think about whether I use it up or just keep the nice bottle.

Bob
Attachments
Immersion oil Cargill 1.jpg
Immersion oil Cargill 1.jpg (131.12 KiB) Viewed 2235 times
Immersion oil Cargill B 2.jpg
Immersion oil Cargill B 2.jpg (134.2 KiB) Viewed 2235 times

Hobbyst46
Posts: 2927
Joined: Mon Aug 21, 2017 9:02 pm

Re: Cargill immersion oil "B" probably 1960s

#2 Post by Hobbyst46 » Mon Jun 15, 2020 8:40 pm

Hi Bob,
Type B is roughly 10 times as viscous as type A. Could be useful for an inverted microscope, but for upright, I find it too messy to clean afterwards.
Sorry, do not know about the PCB...
Zeiss Standard GFL+Canon EOS-M10, Olympus VMZ stereo

User avatar
75RR
Posts: 7330
Joined: Sun Oct 12, 2014 2:34 am
Location: Estepona, Spain

Re: Cargill immersion oil "B" probably 1960s

#3 Post by 75RR » Tue Jun 16, 2020 6:36 am

"Cargille PCB-Free Immersion oils were introduced in 1972."

https://us.vwr.com/store/product/123599 ... y-sciences
Zeiss Standard WL (somewhat fashion challenged) & Wild M8
Olympus E-P2 (Micro Four Thirds Camera)

MicroBob
Posts: 2211
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2016 9:11 am
Location: Northern Germany

Re: Cargill immersion oil "B" probably 1960s

#4 Post by MicroBob » Tue Jun 16, 2020 7:24 am

Hi Doron, Hi Glen,

thank you, that makes things clear for me. I don't have an interted that uses oil immersion and since the microscope is probably from before 1972 it is likely that the oil contains PCB. So I will bring the oil with the necessary description to a waste collection center. I try to limit the use of critical substances and as there is regular cleaning involved with the use of immersion oil I would contaminate lots of tissue and have no proper way of disposal.

Bob

Leitzcycler
Posts: 93
Joined: Mon Sep 09, 2019 11:55 am

Re: Cargill immersion oil "B" probably 1960s

#5 Post by Leitzcycler » Tue Jun 16, 2020 7:38 am

For what purpose there was PCB in immersion oils? :shock:

MicroBob
Posts: 2211
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2016 9:11 am
Location: Northern Germany

Re: Cargill immersion oil "B" probably 1960s

#6 Post by MicroBob » Tue Jun 16, 2020 7:53 am

I think it was difficult to find an oil that doesn't gum up, doesn't damage the front lens seals, is easy to wipe of and have the refraction index of glass. Early on they used cedar oil, but that gummed up quickly and the surfaces had to be cleaned thoroughly. I don't know what they used to substitute PCBs - maybe not much better...

MichaelG.
Posts: 2408
Joined: Mon Apr 10, 2017 8:24 am
Location: NorthWest England

Re: Cargill immersion oil "B" probably 1960s

#7 Post by MichaelG. » Tue Jun 16, 2020 8:28 am

Useful source of information, including MSDS:

https://www.cargille.com/available-refr ... atasheets/

MichaelG.
Too many 'projects'

MicroBob
Posts: 2211
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2016 9:11 am
Location: Northern Germany

Re: Cargill immersion oil "B" probably 1960s

#8 Post by MicroBob » Tue Jun 16, 2020 8:45 am

Hi Michael,
thank you for the link!
About the components the MSDS is quite transparent: "Trade secret" :lol:
The data sheet is more interesting: "Aliphatic / Alicyclic Hydrocarbons and Hydrogenated Terphen"
A chemist might have an idea what this could be round about.

Bob

MichaelG.
Posts: 2408
Joined: Mon Apr 10, 2017 8:24 am
Location: NorthWest England

Re: Cargill immersion oil "B" probably 1960s

#9 Post by MichaelG. » Tue Jun 16, 2020 9:08 am

MicroBob wrote:
Tue Jun 16, 2020 8:45 am
About the components the MSDS is quite transparent: "Trade secret" :lol:
Yes ... I’m a little surprised that they get away with that ^^^

But they might be happy to answer your original question

MichaelG.
Too many 'projects'

MicroBob
Posts: 2211
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2016 9:11 am
Location: Northern Germany

Re: Cargill immersion oil "B" probably 1960s

#10 Post by MicroBob » Tue Jun 16, 2020 9:56 am

MichaelG. wrote:
Tue Jun 16, 2020 9:08 am
But they might be happy to answer your original question
Good idea, I have sent them an e-mail and will report what they do.

Hobbyst46
Posts: 2927
Joined: Mon Aug 21, 2017 9:02 pm

Re: Cargill immersion oil "B" probably 1960s

#11 Post by Hobbyst46 » Tue Jun 16, 2020 10:42 am

MicroBob wrote:
Tue Jun 16, 2020 8:45 am
Hi Michael,
thank you for the link!
About the components the MSDS is quite transparent: "Trade secret" :lol:
The data sheet is more interesting: "Aliphatic / Alicyclic Hydrocarbons and Hydrogenated Terphen"
A chemist might have an idea what this could be round about.

Bob
Bob, Michael,
Aliphatic and alicyclic hydrocarbon and hydrogenated terpenes are not PCBs. Neither are they aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene, xylene or larger molecules)
that are carcinogenic or at least suspects.
Last edited by Hobbyst46 on Tue Jun 16, 2020 11:20 am, edited 1 time in total.
Zeiss Standard GFL+Canon EOS-M10, Olympus VMZ stereo

MicroBob
Posts: 2211
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2016 9:11 am
Location: Northern Germany

Re: Cargill immersion oil "B" probably 1960s

#12 Post by MicroBob » Tue Jun 16, 2020 11:06 am

Hobbyst46 wrote:
Tue Jun 16, 2020 10:42 am
Aliphatic and alicyclic hydrocarbon and hydrogenated terpenes are not PCBs.
These are the components in todays PCB free cargille immersion oil. PCBs were used before but I have no information on the percentage in the mix. I have some Aroclor which is pure PCB as far as I know. It would have a nice consistency for an immersion oil but it hardens.

Hobbyst46
Posts: 2927
Joined: Mon Aug 21, 2017 9:02 pm

Re: Cargill immersion oil "B" probably 1960s

#13 Post by Hobbyst46 » Tue Jun 16, 2020 11:22 am

I see that during the 1990's, Cargille asked and received exemptions from the FDA, that allowed it to continue to manufacture and market PCB-based mountants and immersion oils.
So I edited my previous response and wiped away unbased beliefs...
Zeiss Standard GFL+Canon EOS-M10, Olympus VMZ stereo

MicroBob
Posts: 2211
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2016 9:11 am
Location: Northern Germany

Re: Cargill immersion oil "B" probably 1960s

#14 Post by MicroBob » Tue Jun 16, 2020 11:40 am

I recently bought a Zeiss Standard Junior, Bundeswehr-version with 10W lamp in the foot. From the print on the lamp transformer in the base I conclude it was made in 1988, much later than Standard Juniors were in production. This fits to the modern logo on the foot. Included was a bottle of "Zeiss" immersion oil, marked "PCB free". This is my only indicator for the introduction of PCB-free immersion oils. I can imagine that they produced these PCB containig immersion oils for special purposes were a safe disposal and personal safety were guaranteed.

MicroBob
Posts: 2211
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2016 9:11 am
Location: Northern Germany

Re: Cargill immersion oil "B" probably 1960s

#15 Post by MicroBob » Thu Sep 10, 2020 5:50 am

Hi together,
just to complete the topic: Cargille didn't respond to my friendly e-Mail so I have to expect that the oil contains at least PCB, possibly other harmful substances the didn't want to discover. I brought the oil to our local recycling center, with an added sticker "contains PCB". I would have like to keep the nice bottle, but too much hassle and mess with the PCB oil to make this worthwhile.

Bob

BramHuntingNematodes
Posts: 495
Joined: Tue Jan 21, 2020 1:29 am
Location: Georgia, USA

Re: Cargill immersion oil "B" probably 1960s

#16 Post by BramHuntingNematodes » Thu Sep 10, 2020 6:16 am

Yeah chemicals from the 60s at a bare minimum have at least a little lead and nicotine in them too
1942 Bausch and Lomb Series T Dynoptic, Custom Illumination

apochronaut
Posts: 3539
Joined: Fri May 15, 2015 12:15 am

Re: Cargill immersion oil "B" probably 1960s

#17 Post by apochronaut » Thu Sep 10, 2020 10:50 am

Cigarette smoke was what kept most of the airplanes flying in the 60's. As with most complex machinery it is the smoke that made them run well. I have personally observed that as soon as the smoke starts to escape from machinery, it very soon after quits running. The secret is to keep all the smoke inside, don't let it escape.

Post Reply