Couple newbie questions, please.

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Flyguy784
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Joined: Mon Sep 26, 2016 3:34 pm

Couple newbie questions, please.

#1 Post by Flyguy784 » Thu Sep 29, 2016 3:20 pm

Rank but very excited newb here. Although the title of this forum is beginners corner, in reading some of the posted questions, I'm not so sure. Just purchased my first scope and I'm lovin it. I've started with some, I'm sure, common observations. Blood cells, cheek cells, insect wings etc. As well, some local water samples from creeks, ponds etc. You sure can get absorbed in this. I got so familiar with a couple of the little creatures, watching them eat, move and poop, I felt bad rinsing off the well slide. I got over it!
Anyway, I have a Bristoline scope. Although it came with a filter holder, alas no filters.Should I have at least a blue filter? For casual observations.
What immersion oil should I use if I wish to go to that level magnification?
Is there a definitive site, book that will help me identify my aquatic micro organisms? I've started the googling process but perhaps your experience has already located what I'm looking for. Diatoms as well. I've never seen them alive until now. What an exquisite animal.
Thanks for tolerating what appears to be very basic questions.

Flyguy784
Posts: 4
Joined: Mon Sep 26, 2016 3:34 pm

Re: Couple newbie questions, please.

#2 Post by Flyguy784 » Thu Sep 29, 2016 3:24 pm

Oops, skip the immersion oil question. Going to Cargil site now.

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75RR
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Re: Couple newbie questions, please.

#3 Post by 75RR » Thu Sep 29, 2016 3:44 pm

Here is a link you should find useful:
Fundamentals of Light Microscopy and Electronic Imaging (1st Edition)
Don't try to read it all in one sitting!
http://www.biology.uoc.gr/courses/BIOL4 ... s/book.pdf

and some links from the Resources (online, books etc.) section to help with IDs

viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1024
viewtopic.php?f=15&t=806
viewtopic.php?f=15&t=25
Zeiss Standard WL (somewhat fashion challenged) & Wild M8
Olympus E-P2 (Micro Four Thirds Camera)

JimT
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Re: Couple newbie questions, please.

#4 Post by JimT » Thu Sep 29, 2016 4:16 pm

http://www.microscopy-uk.org.uk/mag/ind ... index.html

Check out the above site as well for info and filter how to's. I have a blue filter but have never used it.

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Oliver
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Re: Couple newbie questions, please.

#5 Post by Oliver » Thu Sep 29, 2016 7:11 pm

Hello,
Should I have at least a blue filter?
Older tungsten and halogen lamps might produce a light that is more red and the blue filter gives the image a more neutral color (for photography). If you turn the lamp on to low brightness, then the color is also more red and the blue filter helps compensate that. Might also reduce the heating of the specimen by removing infrared light. Not so relevant for LEDs.

Replace blue filter with darkfield patch stop or polarization filter (from 3D glasses) and place second polarization filter on top of specimen to view crystals etc.

Oliver
Image Oliver Kim - http://www.microbehunter.com - Microscopes: Olympus CH40 - Olympus CH-A - Breukhoven BMS student microscope - Euromex stereo - uSCOPE MXII

apochronaut
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Re: Couple newbie questions, please.

#6 Post by apochronaut » Fri Sep 30, 2016 1:57 pm

Blue filters shorten the wavelength of the illumination beam. Shorter wavelength light will increase resolution given that other factors remain equal.
Achromatic objectives have chromatic aberration, usually showing red, pink or yellow diffraction bands. Blue filters, can absorb some of this chroma and improve image quality.

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hkv
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Re: Couple newbie questions, please.

#7 Post by hkv » Fri Sep 30, 2016 1:59 pm

You need a blue filter if you have a regular lamp. I use it almost every time, especially when you have to turn down the light and the image get's all yellow. Blue filter, and you are instantly back to daylight.

apochronaut
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Re: Couple newbie questions, please.

#8 Post by apochronaut » Fri Sep 30, 2016 2:56 pm

Even at high voltages, the right density of blue filter always improves image quality.

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