floaters

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keithstout
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floaters

#1 Post by keithstout » Thu Jul 23, 2020 5:07 pm

I have annoying floaters in my eyeballs as I look in my microscopes. I know they are in my eyes because I'd view with one eye through my monocular Leitz, switch eyes, and see that the floaters have changed. The floaters in one eye might be spots, and in the others thread like filaments. On another day they might be a combination of shapes. They slowly drift back and forth. I've turned the eyepiece and the objective, and no floaters follow the movement. I just got a clean bill of health from the optometrist. I seem to notice them alot more when using higher magnification objectives. I didn't think to ask my optometrist this, but does every microscopist experience this?

Keith.

BramHuntingNematodes
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Re: floaters

#2 Post by BramHuntingNematodes » Thu Jul 23, 2020 5:27 pm

floaters are definitely more prominent when looking at a bright image through an eyepiece. More bothersome is an astigmatism in my right eye that creates a blurry spot right in the middle of my field of vision. Amazing how well the brain can compensate for these in day-to-day activity!
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MichaelG.
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Re: floaters

#3 Post by MichaelG. » Thu Jul 23, 2020 6:24 pm

keithstout wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 5:07 pm
I have annoying floaters in my eyeballs as I look in my microscopes.
[...] but does every microscopist experience this?

Keith.
.
Very common I'm afraid, Keith

Experiment with your illumination settings until you find what works best for you.

MichaelG.
Too many 'projects'

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75RR
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Re: floaters

#4 Post by 75RR » Thu Jul 23, 2020 6:57 pm

A lot of people do not realize they have them until they look though a microscope, binoculars, etc ...

Changing the angle one looks through the eyepieces by adjusting chair height and posture helps.
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Zuul
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Re: floaters

#5 Post by Zuul » Thu Jul 23, 2020 7:20 pm

Would putting a few saline drops in your eyes before a viewing session help flush the floaters out? I know you can’t eliminate them. I just wonder if you minimize them. Maybe I’ll try this the next time they are very conspicuous.

MichaelG.
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Re: floaters

#6 Post by MichaelG. » Thu Jul 23, 2020 10:36 pm

Zuul wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 7:20 pm
Would putting a few saline drops in your eyes before a viewing session help flush the floaters out?
‘fraid not ... they are inside the eye, in the vitreous humour.

MichaelG.
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keithstout
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Re: floaters

#7 Post by keithstout » Fri Jul 24, 2020 12:23 am

All of this is very helpful. Thank you so much. I'll try these ideas to see if I can reduce them. I'll post my results when I learn something. I did think about eyedrops before viewing, but w have an answer for that.

Keith

Tom Jones
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Re: floaters

#8 Post by Tom Jones » Fri Jul 24, 2020 2:18 am

Floaters are inside your eye. There is nothing you can put in your eyes that will get rid of them.

The best option is to learn to ignore them. If they're bad, the next best option is laser vitriolysis, where a YAG laser is used by an ophthalmologist to disrupt them as much as possible. There are four or five ophthalmologists in the US that will do the procedure that have a lot of experience. Laser vitriolysis can't be used if the floaters are near either the front of the eye or near the retina as the risk of damage goes way up. I had it done 11 years ago and again ('cause they can come back...) a couple months ago. I doubt I'd trust newbies.

The last option is vitrectomy, which is a fairly risky procedure where the vitrious gel, which contains the floaters, is removed. Cataracts, infections, and detached retinas are potential side effects.

Most ophthalmologists won't see them during routine exams, and will tell you to learn to live with them if you complain. Unless they're really bad, that's good advice. If they don't bother you normally, get a camera for your microscope and look at a monitor most of the time, and learn to ignore them. It's cheaper that way anyhow.

MichaelG.
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Re: floaters

#9 Post by MichaelG. » Fri Jul 24, 2020 6:28 am

I have no connection with Mayo Clinic ... but this is a good description of ‘floaters’

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-con ... c-20372346#

MichaelG.
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Sabatini
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Re: floaters

#10 Post by Sabatini » Sat Jul 25, 2020 2:49 pm

Cordial Greetings
I read this some time ago about it and the video explains a little bit about what happens and why they are there.

I hope I don't misinform.

https://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-are-tho ... ser#review

PeteM
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Re: floaters

#11 Post by PeteM » Sat Jul 25, 2020 3:45 pm

You might find the floaters easier to for your brain to ignore by viewing through a binocular rather than monocular microscope? Just to posit a theory -- your brain gets two images to average?

Proper Kohler illumination may also help.

I'd find them very prominent in an antique monocular microscope with a mirror as the light source. Don't notice them with any modern binocular microscope.

deBult
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Re: floaters

#12 Post by deBult » Sat Jul 25, 2020 7:06 pm

75RR wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 6:57 pm

Changing the angle one looks through the eyepieces by adjusting chair height and posture helps.
My own IMPRESSION is the floaters are less annoying when using dark field observation In your scope: it is worth trying YMMV though.

keithstout
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Re: floaters

#13 Post by keithstout » Sun Jul 26, 2020 4:04 am

MichaelG. wrote:
Fri Jul 24, 2020 6:28 am
I have no connection with Mayo Clinic ... but this is a good description of ‘floaters’

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-con ... c-20372346#

MichaelG.
This is spot on, Michael, like it was written for me. Thank you so much.

keithstout
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Re: floaters

#14 Post by keithstout » Sun Jul 26, 2020 4:12 am

PeteM wrote:
Sat Jul 25, 2020 3:45 pm
You might find the floaters easier to for your brain to ignore by viewing through a binocular rather than monocular microscope? Just to posit a theory -- your brain gets two images to average?

Proper Kohler illumination may also help.

I'd find them very prominent in an antique monocular microscope with a mirror as the light source. Don't notice them with any modern binocular microscope.
You're right, Pete. When I use my binocular Leitz, the floaters are far less noticeable. The seduction of it all is the optimum contrast and definition afforded by the monocular design married with apo/plano objectives. The image quality is irresistible! I use my binocular for diatom picking and herding. I suppose when the floaters show up in daily vision, I'll be ready for a new set of eyeballs.

JGardner
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Re: floaters

#15 Post by JGardner » Thu Dec 31, 2020 7:00 am

When I got back into microscopy a few years ago I was shocked at the number of floaters I saw. I’ve gotten used to it now and they don’t bother me.

I’ve been thinking about getting back into amateur astronomy again and am wondering if floaters are an issue when observing with telescopes? Anyone have any experience with this?

D0c
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Re: floaters

#16 Post by D0c » Thu Dec 31, 2020 8:25 am

JGardner wrote:
Thu Dec 31, 2020 7:00 am
When I got back into microscopy a few years ago I was shocked at the number of floaters I saw. I’ve gotten used to it now and they don’t bother me.

I’ve been thinking about getting back into amateur astronomy again and am wondering if floaters are an issue when observing with telescopes? Anyone have any experience with this?
Astronomy is one of my many hobbies and I always see floaters while using high powered eyepieces.

Greg Howald
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Re: floaters

#17 Post by Greg Howald » Sun Jan 03, 2021 2:29 pm

Right you are. The lower the eyepiece magnification, the lesser the problem with floaters. And yes, I had to learn to ignore the effect of my slight degree of macular degeneration.
Greg

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micro
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Re: floaters

#18 Post by micro » Sun Jan 03, 2021 4:43 pm

Are you using large wide angle eyepieces? With my swift 380t floaters are a non issue for the most part. But then I upgraded to another microscope that had bigger eyepieces and for some reason the bigger eye pieces make the floater issue vastly worse. But I just hook my microscope camera up to a monitor for live viewing so it doesn't matter anyway.

Greg Howald
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Re: floaters

#19 Post by Greg Howald » Mon Jan 04, 2021 3:00 am

When it bugs me I connect a camera. Large screen. Distance from my eyes. No floaters.
Greg

Javier
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Re: floaters

#20 Post by Javier » Mon Jan 04, 2021 2:04 pm

I have some mild problems with floaters when observing the moon, and to a lesser extent the planets, at exit pupils below 1 mm. No problems when observing DSO whatsoever.

I found that they are a big issue in microscopy when using my monocular scope (the only one I own) and magnification beyond 400x. The white background, low light conditions, and ultra small exit pupil combine to make the floaters quite evident. I found that if I close my observing eye or switch to dark field for about 15 or 30 seconds, when I switch back to high power bright field the floaters will be gone for a while. When pupil constriction occurs again, the floaters will also come back.

It seems to me -and this is only my experience- that the amount of integrated light, determined by the size of the exit pupil, is directly related to the appearance of floaters. In other words, very small exit pupils won't integrate enough light to hide the floaters in the long term, despite the brightness of the target.

EYE C U
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Re: floaters

#21 Post by EYE C U » Sun Jan 10, 2021 4:00 am

this summer i had an internal eye hemorrhage....took about 3 months for the blood to filter out....it was like having my own bubble level when i looked up or down...the blood is gone but i still have what looks like a clear film plastic bag in a bottle looking thing that floats around...if i move my eye around i can get it to move out of the center for a while. then i messed up my other eye...just can win

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