New/beginner hobbyist

What is your microscopy history? What are your interests? What equipment do you use?
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ajmckay
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New/beginner hobbyist

#1 Post by ajmckay » Sat Dec 09, 2017 6:21 pm

So I definitely do not need any new hobbies LOL... But my 7yr old daughter wants a microscope for Christmas and I've wanted to dabble for years so regardless of how interested she gets I believe I will have fun with this hobby.

My goals for the hobby:
- Experience my Saltwater Aquarium in a new way (nano-reef)
- Teach my daughters about the microscopic world, microorganisms, cells, bacteria, etc...
- Take quality images/video. I'm particularly impressed by the person that runs aurelm.com.
He does some pretty amazing stuff with what appears to be relatively basic equipment and a cell phone.

I have no microscope. I've decided that I can spend about $300 on this venture for the time being.
Needs:
- A scope that will work for my daughter and I
- After quite a bit of back and forth I think that a compound scope will be the best. I was initially planning to get a stereo but if my daughter really wants to go that route cheap USB options exist that have good image quality - such as Plugable and Andonstar options on Amazon (in addition to the compound scope)
- Binocular or Trinocular for camera attachment
- Something that won't need a lot of work initially (Just getting into this - I'm mechanically inclined but would rather not have to fix things right off the bat)
- Simple options for connecting a camera - either a cell phone or a Nikon DSLR

Wants:
- Plan objectives since I want to make images/videos
- Darkfield-capable condenser. As of this moment I simply enjoy the aesthetics - but I also think it's useful in reducing slide prep time for certain specimens

I need to order one in the next few days if I'm going to get it by Christmas - so my list is narrowed down to:
- New Amscope T490B-PL (trinocular, Plan objectives but no darkfield) $325 on eBay
- New Amscope T340A-LED-DK (trinocular, darkfield but no plan) $300 on eBay. There's an OMAX version for about the same price/specification.
- Used Leica CME - between $250 and $350 appears to be a reasonable range. I like this one because I can find it with plan objectives and the condenser features a slide slot for a darkfield filter. It's binocular but I have a 3D printer - hoping I can use that to prototype a solution for an eyepiece camera mount.
- Used Nikon Alphaphot - $250-$300. Binocular. There are a lot of them so I feel I could find one in good condition but they typically don't have plan objectives. My understanding is that darkfield can be obtained here using a filter as well, just not on a slide.

Which would you go for? I'm personally thinking the Amscope with the plan objectives and then adding a darkfield condenser/filter later. I like the idea of the leica though as it's ready to go and probably higher quality optics even used but no trinocular port so my camera mounting options may be limited...

Thanks! Excited to join. :)

MichaelG.
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Re: New/beginner hobbyist

#2 Post by MichaelG. » Sat Dec 09, 2017 6:56 pm

ajmckay wrote:So I definitely do not need any new hobbies LOL... But my 7yr old daughter wants a microscope for Christmas and I've wanted to dabble for years so regardless of how interested she gets I believe I will have fun with this hobby.
Welcome !
... Great to have a shared interest in microscopy.

If you haven't seen them yet: May I recommend the series of videos Pipa's Progress:
http://www.microscopy-uk.org.uk/index.h ... index.html
It won't answer your specific questions, but it's a wonderful introduction which I feel sure your daughter will enjoy.

MichaelG.
.
Edit: This link to the Vimeo version might be better:
https://vimeopro.com/molsmith/pippas-pr ... o/81059913
Too many 'projects'

Hobbyst46
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Re: New/beginner hobbyist

#3 Post by Hobbyst46 » Sat Dec 09, 2017 9:55 pm

Welcome.

You can take decent pictures oh a binocular with a smartphone and a ~45 $ adapter. I imagine that the design and printout of a trinocular head from scratch is a serious challenge. The only slight modification will be to relocate the phone a little bit so the camera lens (the rear camera of course) will be at the focal point of the eyepiece. It is not difficult to achieve it.

If you go for a DSLR - experts have warned on various Forums, that mirror and shutter vibrations may negatively affect the image quality. A mirrorless camera seems to be a better solution. But then you really need a trinocular head.

The Alphaphot is a very good microscope, at least for brightfield.

Good luck.
Zeiss Standard GFL+Canon EOS-M10, Olympus VMZ stereo

JimT
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Re: New/beginner hobbyist

#4 Post by JimT » Sat Dec 09, 2017 11:30 pm

Amscope with the plan objectives and then adding a darkfield condenser/filter later.
I have an Amscope and am very happy with it. I upgraded to plan objs for the 4x, 10x, and 40x. I also added a 20x obj. for when 10x is not enough and 40x is too much and a 60x obj. because I don't like messing with the oil and then having to clean the 100x. Best thing I did as an upgrade. Plan objs work great for very flat subjects but with a drop of pond water there will always be some areas not in focus.

You can make dark field filters and many other filters for your scope yourself - nice project for you and your daughter. See this site;

http://www.microscopy-uk.org.uk/mag/ind ... trast.html

Amscope sells adopters for the camera port and if you have a Canon DSLR it offers remote shooting with mirror lock up. Never had a vibration problem.

Last bit of advice. Throw the 20x eyepieces away. Not heavy enough for paper weights. What you get is "Empty magnification".

Good luck and also check out this site's Home Page for buying advice;

http://www.microbehunter.com/

JimT

ajmckay
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Re: New/beginner hobbyist

#5 Post by ajmckay » Sun Dec 10, 2017 6:23 am

MichaelG. wrote: ... Great to have a shared interest in microscopy.

If you haven't seen them yet: May I recommend the series of videos Pipa's Progress:
http://www.microscopy-uk.org.uk/index.h ... index.html
It won't answer your specific questions, but it's a wonderful introduction which I feel sure your daughter will enjoy.

MichaelG.
.
Edit: This link to the Vimeo version might be better:
https://vimeopro.com/molsmith/pippas-pr ... o/81059913
Michael - thanks a ton for that site. I'll definitely be ordering the book. While I plan to spend plenty of time learning with her she likes "self study" as well.
Welcome.

You can take decent pictures oh a binocular with a smartphone and a ~45 $ adapter. I imagine that the design and printout of a trinocular head from scratch is a serious challenge. The only slight modification will be to relocate the phone a little bit so the camera lens (the rear camera of course) will be at the focal point of the eyepiece. It is not difficult to achieve it.

If you go for a DSLR - experts have warned on various Forums, that mirror and shutter vibrations may negatively affect the image quality. A mirrorless camera seems to be a better solution. But then you really need a trinocular head.

The Alphaphot is a very good microscope, at least for brightfield.

Good luck.
Thanks for the tips! I wasn't proposing to print out a trinocular head - but rather an adapter of sorts were it needed. I have heard of the shutter vibration issue - probably didn't give it enough thought though. I just looked at my DSLR manual and unfortunately it has no mirror lock function other than for cleaning. I'm probably due for another camera soon anyways... It's an older Nikon D60 and it just hit 115,000 shutter count lol... On the topic of the Autophot - I've searched but I don't see much info on converting it for darkfield use. Do you know of an instructional of sorts that gives the details of that? There are some nice deals on used Autophots.
I have an Amscope and am very happy with it. I upgraded to plan objs for the 4x, 10x, and 40x. I also added a 20x obj. for when 10x is not enough and 40x is too much and a 60x obj. because I don't like messing with the oil and then having to clean the 100x. Best thing I did as an upgrade. Plan objs work great for very flat subjects but with a drop of pond water there will always be some areas not in focus.

You can make dark field filters and many other filters for your scope yourself - nice project for you and your daughter. See this site;

http://www.microscopy-uk.org.uk/mag/ind ... trast.html

Amscope sells adopters for the camera port and if you have a Canon DSLR it offers remote shooting with mirror lock up. Never had a vibration problem.

Last bit of advice. Throw the 20x eyepieces away. Not heavy enough for paper weights. What you get is "Empty magnification".

Good luck and also check out this site's Home Page for buying advice;

http://www.microbehunter.com/
Thanks JimT. Glad to hear you like your Amscope, and that the plan objectives are worth it. Honestly I don't understand the whole principle behind darkfield yet - so buying a scope with a drop in darkfield specific condenser would obviously be easiest but I do see all these people using things like coins or cardboard. My initial thought is that these methods wouldn't produce as good of a result but I suppose as long as you have something that can be centered'adjusted and blocks light there can't be that many other variables to consider? I'll read up on those projects. Ultimately though it's cheaper to obtain a dedicated darkfield condenser than it is to swap all my objectives to Plan - that is if I even decide that I need one to get good darkfield images...


Any other advice? My bias is actually swaying toward the Amscope (the T490-PL) a bit now... They seem to have great features and acceptable enough optics. The only real downside I see to them is low to non-existant resale. Whereas even 30 year old name brand scopes still fetch a decent amount used (in good condition mostly it seems).

Hobbyst46
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Re: New/beginner hobbyist

#6 Post by Hobbyst46 » Sun Dec 10, 2017 11:45 am

My two cents about darkfield, since you mentioned coins...

Darkfield in general means that the item in focus, your object of interest, appears as a bright object on dark background.
The method is oblique illumination - the light rays are directed at an angle to the specimen, rather than directly (vertically) onto the specimen. A hollow cone of light surrounds the specimen.
This can be obtained either with transmitted light, through the condenser->specimen->objective->eyepiece, OR with epi-illumination, that is from a lamp above the specimen, mostly through the objective.

A good research microscope offers the two illumination paths, but it costs a lot. Epi-illumination requires specific objectives. I believe that within the budget you will settle for transmitted light darkfield. This can be obtained with a dedicated condenser that has the darkfield disk; the alternative is to fabricate your own by inserting a thin flat circular disk made of almost any opaque material below the condenser aperture - perhaps in the filter holder.
You can find many ideas like this in the Micscape or Microscopy-UK sites.

And to look at coins or other opaque objects from above, use a simple goose-neck, inclined at an angle from above. It will give you a sort of darkfield.
Zeiss Standard GFL+Canon EOS-M10, Olympus VMZ stereo

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zzffnn
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Re: New/beginner hobbyist

#7 Post by zzffnn » Sun Dec 10, 2017 3:44 pm

Best option is buying a reconditioned used scope, such as American Optical Spencer 10 or 110 from a reputable forum member or dealer. But you may not be able to get it before Christmas.

Otherwise used scopes may not work perfectly or look shinny new upon delivery.

Those AmScopes may be your only choice, if you have to get a shinny scope that works perfectly before Xmas.

The 490 model looks better overall. But it may not provide the "wow" moment, due to its lack of darkfield.

The darkfield model may provide that "wow" moment, as it has a nice dedicated dry darkfield condenser. It should be better than darkfield filter on a slide or DIY darkfield (DIY darkfield is not difficult to make, but may not be easy the first time around at over10x objective). But its overall mechanical and optical quality is lower. And I am not sure its 3w LED is enough or easily replaceable.

AmScope has low resale value, because many chepaer used scopes provide equal or better mechanical / optical quality.

Leica CME may be an infinity corrected scope that do not have that many cheap used parts available (160 mm tube length optics won't work well on infinity scopes, and brand compatibility is better within the 160mm tube system, than infinity system). Many AO Spencer are also infinity corrected, but there are many used parts available.

Plan objectives are actually not that necessary, if you subjects of interest are not flat or move very fast.

Yes, a good powerful illumination system is worth the money.

And yes, most 20x eyepieces are uncomfortable to use. A 20x objective to bridge the gap between 10x and 40x objective is a much better idea.

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Re: New/beginner hobbyist

#8 Post by MichaelG. » Sun Dec 10, 2017 5:48 pm

zzffnn wrote: ...Leica CME may be an infinity corrected scope that do not have that many cheap used parts available (160 mm tube length optics won't work well on infinity scopes, and brand compatibility is better within the 160mm tube system, than infinity system).
I am not familiar with the Leica CME, but ... noting your very sensible comment, I went looking:
https://www.meyerinst.com/microscopes/cme/cme-tech.pdf
It is 160mm tube length, and appears to be a nicely designed instrument.

MichaelG.

Update: This is worth a look
http://www.microscopy-uk.org.uk/mag/art ... leica.html
Last edited by MichaelG. on Sun Dec 10, 2017 5:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: New/beginner hobbyist

#9 Post by lorez » Sun Dec 10, 2017 5:52 pm

Best option is buying a reconditioned used scope, such as American Optical Spencer 10 or 110 from a reputable forum member or dealer. But you may not be able to get it before Christmas.
It probably just a coincidence that I have an AO10 that is in good condition and is available before Christmas if you are in the US.

lorez

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Re: New/beginner hobbyist

#10 Post by zzffnn » Sun Dec 10, 2017 6:15 pm

I apologize for my mistake. I must have confused the infinity Leica models that I have seen with that one.

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Re: New/beginner hobbyist

#11 Post by MichaelG. » Sun Dec 10, 2017 6:25 pm

zzffnn wrote:I apologize for my mistake. I must have confused the infinity Leica models that I have seen with that one.
No need for apolgy ... We're all on this journey together !
I think the infinity one is DME

MichaelG.
.
https://www.meyerinst.com/microscopes/dme/dme-tech.pdf
Too many 'projects'

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Re: New/beginner hobbyist

#12 Post by apochronaut » Sun Dec 10, 2017 11:19 pm

The CME , is Leica's replacement for the B & L/Cambridge/Leica Galen III, and in fact uses very similar optics, so there is good older optical compatability , there..
The DME, is a design improvement over initially,the infinity corrected Reichert 150, then it's heir in the marketplace, the Leica ATC 2000. One of the design element changes and one necessary to navigate around, in any potential optical improvement of the DME, are the HCX series objectives with 25mm threads. The microscope has the capability to be upgraded , with better optical choices but the better HCX and HC objectives are prohibitively expensive. The older Leica Delta objectives with RMS threads and in fact the so called Buffalo objectives from the Leica ATC 2000, or the neoplan, planachro or planfluorite 45mm parfocal infinity corrected Reichert/Cambridge, or even older Reichert infinity objectives are also compatible , with the use of a 25mm to RMS adapter for each objective.
Within that 1975 to 2004 time frame, various objectives were made, that would be parfocal on the DME and assist in giving the instrument better optical performance and flexibility, than it's somewhat limited stock of factory optics, allows.

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Re: New/beginner hobbyist

#13 Post by JimT » Mon Dec 11, 2017 1:40 am

Ajmckay, as you can see you are getting a lot of advice from knowledgeable forum members. My final suggestion is keep it simple. This is for you and your seven year daughter (Probably mostly you) as she may get tired of it before New Years :)

Regardless it is a good scope to return to when her interest rekindles.

Great to get a new one "Out of the box" to open together. First day look at hairs, coins (top illuminated - flashlight will do), threads, pins and needle points, etc all with the 4X obj.

When she tires of it you will still have a good scope and should you ever want to upgrade in the future you haven't spent to much and you will have learned a lot.

Final tip. Buy it thru Amazon. Great customer support.

JimT

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Re: New/beginner hobbyist

#14 Post by Charles » Tue Dec 12, 2017 1:10 am

Welcome AJ,

Due to being a Christmas present and for instant gratification of a shiny new microscope, which should work great out of the box, I would vote for the new.

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Re: New/beginner hobbyist

#15 Post by ajmckay » Tue Dec 12, 2017 5:27 am

Sorry it takes me a while to respond... New enough to this that I have to read each response like 4 times to fully understand!! Rather than quote/respond to each response I'll summarize by user.

Hobbyist46 - Thanks for the reply. Note that while looking at coins is definitely on the table I was speaking of the practice of using a coin as an opaque object to create a darkfield effect. I'm still sifting through the microscopy materials! That will take some time LOL!

zzffnn - thanks for the comments. I suppose having somethings new would be nice but ultimately I just want something that I can really enjoy for a long time. You are right that the features of the Amscope are quite good though. Like really good - assuming the optics are decent. I sort of wish the T490 PL had LED instead of halogen but ultimately that's something I can deal with. I mess around with LEDs quite a bit and I'm sure that regardless of the scope I get I could fabricate a "more than adequate" LED retrofit using items I currently have on-hand. I think another reason you don't see a lot of Amscope/OMAX in the used space is that they're pretty cheap to buy new. I'm also guessing that people do modify them which adds some value so there is less of an incentive to sell it.

Lorez - can you PM me details? Looks like there are a lot of configurations for this model so I'm curious what you're asking. I'm unable to send PMs - probably due to being so new.

MichaelG/zzffnn/apochronaut - So based on my research the Leica CME does have some real pros and cons. Unfortunately the one that I really wanted to bid on (being advertised as basically new) but I missed the end of the auction by like 2 minutes LOL... :( :( :( It's still in the running but I'm being swayed by the features of the Amscope.

JimT & Charles - thanks again :) I'll be sure to update everyone with what I get. I'm sure I'll be asking a lot of questions in the beginner forum! It looks like the T340-DK-LED is available on Amazon, but the T490-PL doesn't appear to be. The good news is that the eBay seller it comes from has an excellent feedback score and generally I'm confident buying from eBay.

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Re: New/beginner hobbyist

#16 Post by ajmckay » Wed Dec 20, 2017 5:47 am

So it took me a few days longer than I had hoped but I ordered a microscope!! Ended up paying $160 for a Fisher Scientific "Micromaster Premier" model 12-561-327 on eBay.
Image
(This isn't my actual microscope but a photo I found of the same model)

Here's why I got this model - after quite a bit of back and forth!
- Has plan achromatic objectives (DIN, not infinity corrected)
- Has a nice filter holder for a DIY darkfield stop (going to be using the 3D printer here - just need to find the dimensions of their part number)
- Seller has 100% positive feedback and 14 day return policy
- Decided to lower my budget as I didn't leave much for prepared slide acquisition and supplies to prepare my own
- I missed the auction end for the Amscope T-490 PL by 4 minutes so it was like $20 more expensive to "buy it now", which annoyed me for some reason
- I also researched a few Zeiss models (standard 14 and "4xxxxx series") and the AO 10, 110, and 150 models but everything was pretty old in my price range - even though a lot of them looked good my thought is that maintenance might still need to be performed sooner and to a greater degree than I can handle right now.
- This Fisher scientific appears to have a product life from about 2009-2016 from what I can tell. Not sure what that means for replacement parts or upgrades yet
- I was spending too much time researching - I just needed to make a decision and this one seemed like it fit my needs, offered some expansion (possibly DIY) potential, and was under budget

Here's the product brochure, first model - http://www.thermofishersci.in/lit/Fishe ... scopes.pdf

If anyone has any tips on this model - such as where to find an operators manual, they're always appreciated! I'll be posting some of my DIY ideas in other sub-forums for sure.

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Re: New/beginner hobbyist

#17 Post by Hobbyst46 » Wed Dec 20, 2017 5:14 pm

Congratulations!! With this elegant looking microscope you will probably enjoy your start.
You overcame the first hurdle - decision making without previous experience.
Now awaits an even more exciting challenge - keeping your daughter's interest in it for a reasonably long time, in this world that is flooded with trivial information from other sources (social networks, cellphones and stuff).
May you and she enjoy this journey.
Happy Holidays.
Zeiss Standard GFL+Canon EOS-M10, Olympus VMZ stereo

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Re: New/beginner hobbyist

#18 Post by billbillt » Wed Dec 20, 2017 5:53 pm

This stand will cover 99% of what you want to do as a hobbyist...

"I was spending too much time researching - I just needed to make a decision and this one seemed like it fit my needs, offered some expansion (possibly DIY) potential, and was under budget "

Yes.. This is a common problem.. Far TOO much time is spent on just study, study, study.. After a while it becomes a chore instead of FUN...

The Best,
BillT

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Re: New/beginner hobbyist

#19 Post by Charles » Thu Dec 21, 2017 2:36 pm

A very nice buy. It's good you got the 327 with full Kohler

Did you get this new or used? Generally these go for around $450-$500 new.

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Re: New/beginner hobbyist

#20 Post by ajmckay » Fri Dec 29, 2017 12:46 am

It's arrived!!!! I'm suuuuuper excited. The seller did a fantastic packing job with which I'm quite pleased - probably the best I've ever seen on an eBay item. I had some furniture delivered a few weeks ago and they were very damaged so I've been a bit nervous.

Overall the microscope has far exceeded my expectations considering the price I paid (Used, $99 + shipping)... I was thinking that there would be a lot of plastic pieces but really I've only found a few things that are plastic - the blue handle on the back, adjusting knobs (which feel very nice), and the on/off switch. Everything else appears to be metal or glass. Speaking of - the glass is also very heavy. The eyepieces weigh a lot more than I was anticipating. In short - it was bigger than I thought it would be at just over 39cm tall and 7.5kg.

One nice thing is that it seems to be pretty clean. The head was shipped separate from the frame but the hole in the frame was taped off to prevent dust from getting in. I used some compressed air to blow everything out which seemed to work well except there's still some debris trapped in the back end of the eyepieces which I'll need a swab or something to clear. Does anyone here use a Lens Pen?

Here's pics!
Image
Image
Image

And here's my first cell phone pic - of some random dust/fuzz from a shelf, wetted with a drop of water...
Image

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Re: New/beginner hobbyist

#21 Post by billbillt » Fri Dec 29, 2017 6:40 am

It looks real good to me.. your pic is also very good!...

BillT

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Re: New/beginner hobbyist

#22 Post by MichaelG. » Fri Dec 29, 2017 8:48 am

I would say you got a real bargain there
Well done! ... it's great when something turns out better than anticipated.

Please keep us informed of progress
You're getting excellent results already ... so 2018 should be fun.

MichaelG.
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mrsonchus
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Re: New/beginner hobbyist

#23 Post by mrsonchus » Fri Dec 29, 2017 1:58 pm

Congratulations - you've bought what looks to me to be spot-on for a good solid starter-'scope. The price was superb too!

You've made a very good decision my friend - that little beauty will serve you far better than you may think.

Looking forward to hearing how to get on as you delve deeper into the fine world of the microscopic.

regards and again congratulations.

John B. :D :D :)
John B

ajmckay
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Re: New/beginner hobbyist

#24 Post by ajmckay » Sat Dec 30, 2017 8:29 am

Thanks all for the encouragement!

While I wait for some blank slides to arrive I'll be looking into:
- Microtomes (likely DIY there!)
- cell phone eyepiece adapters (likely 3D printed)
- General slide prep
- A school style "worksheet" for my daughter (who am I kidding - it's for me also!) that identifies parts of the microscope and some accessories along with a word search and crossword puzzle :)

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Re: New/beginner hobbyist

#25 Post by Hobbyst46 » Sat Dec 30, 2017 4:47 pm

ajmckay - maybe late but I have read your notes along this post.

to clean hard-to-reach glass surfaces, like the bottom glass element of the eyepiece, I use Q-tips dipped in isopropanol (iso-propyl alcohol, I think that in the US it is called rubbing alcohol) or octane. Or better still, I exhale towards the lens and, to make use of the condensed water vapor, immediately clean it briefly either with a pre-moistened (not dripping) Q-tip or a special lens tissue, folded at the end of a Q-tip or plastic forceps.

LED or halogen - if the illumination in your nice new microscope is halogen, I would not rush to replace it with LED. The potential issue with halogen is that it emits heat. Otherwise it is a very pleasant light. On the other hand, the installation of a LED may become challenging when you want to preserve the uniformity of illumination brightness across the field of view. I am saying this since you already have full Kohler illumination in the scope.

Both the inward-arrangement of the objectives (pointing "backwards - toward the limb) and the heavy weight (7+ Kg) of the microscope are important pros. Unless one needs a mobile instrument, operating a sturdy, stable microscope is a pleasure.
Zeiss Standard GFL+Canon EOS-M10, Olympus VMZ stereo

ajmckay
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Re: New/beginner hobbyist

#26 Post by ajmckay » Sun Dec 31, 2017 9:48 pm

Hey Hobbyst, thanks a lot for the tips!

For cleaning I was thinking similarly, using a little iso alcohol on a swab. I'm sure the debris is on the eyepiece because when I twist it some specks in the image rotate.

For the lighting I've actually found the halogen to be pretty good. I haven't had it on long enough yet to get it warm. I have read that if you use halogen it's worthwhile to use a blue filter to keep the light from looking too Amber colored.

Now regarding potential lighting upgrades, one thing I have thought about is using one of these: https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B072QC7JF2?psc=1

Im not completely sure how it would affect the uniformity of light, but it would just be an experiment if I feel like messing around. It does appear that most Kohler scopes use halogen, maybe uniformity is the reason? Since LED is such a small light source the iris adjustment probably gets very tricky.

Finally, I didn't even recognize that the backwards pointing objectives was a good thing! Currently it's just chilling with a plastic bag cover, but I'm hoping to build a little dust-resistant cabinet for the microscope with some storage for accessories underneath.

Thanks again!

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Re: New/beginner hobbyist

#27 Post by billbillt » Mon Jan 01, 2018 6:05 am

I HAVE USED THE LED BULB THAT YOU LINKED TO.. WORKED WELL FOR ME...

BILLT

Hobbyst46
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Re: New/beginner hobbyist

#28 Post by Hobbyst46 » Mon Jan 01, 2018 10:52 am

Happy New Year to all.

A 2W LED is in my opinion sufficient for brightfield but for darkfield and phase and in general I would prefer a 8-10W. It is roughly equivalent to 100W halogen which has been the regular lamp supplied with many research microscopes.

Ultimately, as experts in this forum have rightfully reminded me, the illumination spectrum must be judged by the camera response, as well as the human eye...
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Re: New/beginner hobbyist

#29 Post by einman » Mon Jan 01, 2018 3:34 pm

Welcome. Nice looking scope. Should provide you with many hours of enjoyment.

MichaelG.
Posts: 1904
Joined: Mon Apr 10, 2017 8:24 am
Location: NorthWest England

Re: New/beginner hobbyist

#30 Post by MichaelG. » Wed Jan 03, 2018 8:25 am

ajmckay wrote:Im not completely sure how it would affect the uniformity of light, but it would just be an experiment if I feel like messing around. It does appear that most Kohler scopes use halogen, maybe uniformity is the reason?
Not really ^^^

It's worth reading-up on Köhler/Koehler illumination, to understand the principle
... as ever, Wikipedia is a good place to start.

Basically, however, Köhler devised the scheme to make sure that irregularites in the lamp filament were not 'seen' by the imaging optics.
... It's all rather cunning !!

MichaelG.
.

P.S. ... For anyone with a reasonably recent iOS device: This free App is an excellent simulator which demonstrates the practical adjustment of the microscope

Koehler Tutor by Andrew Barlow
https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/koehler ... 28178?mt=8
Too many 'projects'

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