MicrobeHunter.com Microscopy Forum

You can also access this page with: www.microscopy-forum.com
It is currently Sun Apr 21, 2019 2:44 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: gluing the condenser
PostPosted: Fri Feb 08, 2019 10:58 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jan 31, 2019 11:57 am
Posts: 9
Hi
I need to glue the upper lens from condenser. I have tried to do this using the nail polish but this failed after a while. As i use this with polarization it need to by stain free. That sholuld I use?


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: gluing the condenser
PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2019 12:08 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jun 14, 2016 11:01 pm
Posts: 132
Location: Surrey, UK
:shock:
What exactly are you gluing?
Glass to glass? Flat or curved?
A picture would probably reveal all. :idea:


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: gluing the condenser
PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2019 3:41 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jan 31, 2019 11:57 am
Posts: 9
ChrisR wrote:
:shock:
What exactly are you gluing?
Glass to glass? Flat or curved?
A picture would probably reveal all. :idea:


Glass to glass all flat surface. Upper part (with N.A 1,4) unscrewed from the condenser.


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: gluing the condenser
PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 3:40 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Sep 17, 2018 11:31 pm
Posts: 55
Lenses are usually glued together with Canada Balsam. At least that’s how it was done in the past, they may have some new high tech adhesive now.


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: gluing the condenser
PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 8:11 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Aug 21, 2017 9:02 pm
Posts: 1542
Norland makes a wide selection of glass glues that cover a range of refractive indices. They are cured with light - blue or UV. the glue might be permanent, I do not know if the glass elements can be separated later if the need arises.

_________________
Zeiss Standard GFL+Canon EOS-M10, Olympus VMZ stereo


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: gluing the condenser
PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 10:46 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri May 15, 2015 12:15 am
Posts: 2431
How would you determine if it was strain free? If it was empirically, and you found your repair not to be , then you might be happy to have chosen to use a cement that is relatively easy to dissolve and clean. Balsam would be a good choice for that, since ethanol works well and is fairly easy to come by.
However if it was one of the modern, possibly Norland cements then it can only be separated with a methylene chloride based solvent, and it becomes a more complicated situation.


I would determine first what the likely original cement was.if you could. If it was an older condenser, then balsam as previously mentioned is a likelihood and it also would mean that the refractive index of the cement required is around 1.52. That helps choosing a synthetic cement , if you choose to do that.

wporter has some experience using Norland....any advice wporter?


Top
   
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Limited