Inverted VS. Compound microscopes

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Glycolyse
Posts: 129
Joined: Sat Dec 22, 2018 10:07 pm

Inverted VS. Compound microscopes

#1 Post by Glycolyse » Fri Mar 22, 2019 7:47 pm

Hi everyone,

I was wondering what do you guys preferred between inverted and compound microscopes overall. To see the preferences of the members, I created a small poll where everyone is invited to take part in. In this way, we will have clear statistics of the tendency of the forum.

https://www.strawpoll.me/17658488

People who handled both inverted and compound microscopes are eagerly awaited. Ideally, you can explain why you voted one type over the other, the cons and pros of each microscope, etc. It will help beginners in their future purchases.

Have fun voting !

PeteM
Posts: 1091
Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2016 6:22 am
Location: N. California

Re: Inverted VS. Compound microscopes

#2 Post by PeteM » Fri Mar 22, 2019 9:13 pm

Seems to me it's a bit liking asking preferences between sedans and trucks -- or maybe apples and oranges? Each has their appeals and one can surely want -- and maybe have -- both.

Hobbyst46
Posts: 2800
Joined: Mon Aug 21, 2017 9:02 pm

Re: Inverted VS. Compound microscopes

#3 Post by Hobbyst46 » Fri Mar 22, 2019 10:45 pm

Glycolyse wrote:Hi everyone,

I was wondering what do you guys preferred between inverted and compound microscopes overall. To see the preferences of the members, I created a small poll where everyone is invited to take part in. In this way, we will have clear statistics of the tendency of the forum.

https://www.strawpoll.me/17658488

People who handled both inverted and compound microscopes are eagerly awaited. Ideally, you can explain why you voted one type over the other, the cons and pros of each microscope, etc. It will help beginners in their future purchases.

Have fun voting !
IMHO, inverted scopes have a definite and winning advantage if your specimens are contained in open petri dishes, or in microfluidic devices, and in any case that the microscopist needs free access from above.
Zeiss Standard GFL+Canon EOS-M10, Olympus VMZ stereo

PeteM
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Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2016 6:22 am
Location: N. California

Re: Inverted VS. Compound microscopes

#4 Post by PeteM » Sat Mar 23, 2019 12:37 am

I'd add that many of the high end inverted scopes are capable of brightfield, darkfield, phase, fluorescent, DIC, and maybe even laser confocal modes all in one instrument. And, as Hobbyist says, for better access to specimens (probing, manipulating, etc.) as well. That said, regular compound microscopes are the affordable higher power workhorses for most of us.

Nice to have a good stereo, a compound, AND an inverted scope.

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jimur
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Location: Memphis, Tn., US

Re: Inverted VS. Compound microscopes

#5 Post by jimur » Sat Mar 23, 2019 2:44 am

I appreciate having both and truly enjoy using each. It's a difficult matter for me to chose one over the other. It's as if they compete each with the other to gain my attention. Fortunately they have yet to inflict feelings of guilt on my psyche. :roll: Of course each has strong and weaker traits much like siblings if you will. I especially like the ability the inverted offers to maneuver samples of pond water in larger petri dishes or even a small beaker with little or no concern of heat or evaporation. One can maintain and observe the passing parade of microbes in mini-micro aquatic eco systems within petri dishes for days with a little effort. Seeding additional cultures at various stages can prove interesting. If willing to do the work you can have a series of these micro systems each at a different stage within a cycle and study/observe each with little disturbance of the micro organisms. So much to see, so little time.
"You're never too old to have a happy childhood"
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Radazz
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Re: Inverted VS. Compound microscopes

#6 Post by Radazz » Sat Mar 23, 2019 1:57 pm

I have to agree with all of the above mentioned advantages with an inverted.
Mine was one of those surprise offers I couldn’t refuse, and I’d never considered one before that.
The only thing I would not try with one is oil immersion. I use the upright microscope for that exclusively.
Radazz
Arnold, Missouri
Olympus IX70
Olympus BX40
Olympus SZ40

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KurtM
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Re: Inverted VS. Compound microscopes

#7 Post by KurtM » Sun Mar 24, 2019 12:56 am

I am getting along famously with an upright, inverted, and stereo scope on the bench, and each has very specific uses. My primary area of interest is diatoms, and the stereo scope is used almost constantly for a variety of jobs ranging from scanning fresh samples to micromanipulating individual frustules. The inverted scope is used for medium magnification jobs such as further defining fresh samples and monitoring progress of cleaning. The upright is for high power viewing and imaging of (mostly) finished slides. The three compliment each other wonderfully.
Cheers,
Kurt Maurer
League City, Texas
email: ngc704(at)aol(dot)com
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