Ceratium, Tachysoma & Uroglenopsis

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hkv
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Ceratium, Tachysoma & Uroglenopsis

#1 Post by hkv » Sun Nov 05, 2017 11:15 pm

Going through some old and troublesome stacks, I finally took the time to try to sort these out. The Dinoflagellates are difficult to stack as they are very irregular and tend to give a blurry surface structure. The Tachysoma (I think, but not sure about the ID) was moving fiercely, so I had a hard time finding a sequence good enough to stack. I am not 100% sure about the ID on the Uroglena, so please correct me if I am wrong. All taken with a 60X Water Immersion objective. EDIT: Seems to be Uroglenopsis and not Uroglena.

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Ceratium by https://www.flickr.com/photos/micromundus/, on Flickr

Image
Ceratium by https://www.flickr.com/photos/micromundus/, on Flickr

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Tachysoma by https://www.flickr.com/photos/micromundus/, on Flickr

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Uroglena by https://www.flickr.com/photos/micromundus/, on Flickr
Last edited by hkv on Sun Nov 12, 2017 1:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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zzffnn
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Re: Ceratium, Tachysoma & Uroglena

#2 Post by zzffnn » Mon Nov 06, 2017 12:22 am

Very nice! Thank you for sharing.

Did the second Ceratium explode shortly after the photo shoot?

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Re: Ceratium, Tachysoma & Uroglena

#3 Post by charlie g » Mon Nov 06, 2017 6:13 am

Gorgeous image capture of that ciliate with the symbiotic Chlorellae,hkv. I am pleased with the crisp focus of ciliature and the endosybionts your captured..as you dealt with rapid movements of the protozoan ( I enjoy that current texts arer more and more using: protozoa as a loose but clear term...rather than: protist..it recalls my youth to hear:protozoa again!).

The more I am pleased by your shared image captures,hkv...the more I hope you give 1.5% methylcellulose 'viscosity tool' a try with the protozoan subjects. Thanks for your shared microscopy, hkv! Charlie guevara

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cuxlander
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Re: Ceratium, Tachysoma & Uroglena

#4 Post by cuxlander » Mon Nov 06, 2017 12:51 pm

Hi HKV,
I like best the first Ceratium.
Hans

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Re: Ceratium, Tachysoma & Uroglena

#5 Post by Francisco » Mon Nov 06, 2017 3:13 pm

Very very nice

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hkv
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Re: Ceratium, Tachysoma & Uroglena

#6 Post by hkv » Mon Nov 06, 2017 7:47 pm

Thank you all!
zzffnn wrote:Very nice! Thank you for sharing.

Did the second Ceratium explode shortly after the photo shoot?
Not as far as I know, but I saw others bust open. Perhaps from the heat from the lamp and the pressure from the cover glass.

Charlie g wrote:Gorgeous image capture of that ciliate with the symbiotic Chlorellae,hkv. I am pleased with the crisp focus of ciliature and the endosybionts your captured..as you dealt with rapid movements of the protozoan ( I enjoy that current texts arer more and more using: protozoa as a loose but clear term...rather than: protist..it recalls my youth to hear:protozoa again!).

The more I am pleased by your shared image captures,hkv...the more I hope you give 1.5% methylcellulose 'viscosity tool' a try with the protozoan subjects. Thanks for your shared microscopy, hkv! Charlie guevara
I read up on the "Symbiotic Chlorellae" Charlie and I find it quite fascinating! The Chlorellae providing maltose and oxygen to the host organism. I have tried methylcellulose but I find it hard to add after I realise what I have under the glass. I tend to ruin the mount. The camera I have now is quite good at freezing motion due to its high shutter speed and firing rate. Works as a substitute for methylcellulose to some degree.

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Re: Ceratium, Tachysoma & Uroglena

#7 Post by billben74 » Mon Nov 06, 2017 8:34 pm

Very nice.
Personally I like the tachysoma the most because it looks a bit like millipede-like creature.
All up to your normal very high standard.

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Re: Ceratium, Tachysoma & Uroglena

#8 Post by JimT » Tue Nov 07, 2017 12:44 am

All of the above. The first Ceratium is really great. That 60X WI is a treasure.
The camera I have now is quite good at freezing motion due to its high shutter speed and firing rate.
What camera and your technique please.

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Re: Ceratium, Tachysoma & Uroglena

#9 Post by hkv » Tue Nov 07, 2017 1:06 am

JimT wrote:
The camera I have now is quite good at freezing motion due to its high shutter speed and firing rate.
What camera and your technique please.
I switched from Canon 6D to Sony A9. The 6D was useless for water and oil immersion due to shutter vibration. Even though I could carefully select the shutter speed to eliminate blurry shots, the vibration rocked the cover glass so bad that the subjects normally moved between frames in a session/stack. Then the whole stack is ruined. The Sony A9 is completely silent and vibration free as it has an electronic shutter. Also, even at high magnification I can go quite high in ISO without too much noise due to it's sensor performance. 1/2000s is normally not an issue which freezes most cilia. As it has the ability to capture 20 images per second movement is normally limited between each image (1/5 of a second). I try to "roll" back and forth through the focus plan while capturing to get enough frames to do a stack. Sometimes it works, sometimes not. I first used this method for the Vorticella series. Best of course, is if the subject sits still for a while and then I can quickly roll through a stack in a second or two hoping to get decent shots of enough focus planes.

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Re: Ceratium, Tachysoma & Uroglena

#10 Post by charlie g » Tue Nov 07, 2017 3:27 am

Again, thanks for the specifics on your new SONY with electronic shutter, and high ISO performances,hkv (thanks, Jim T for asking about this).

I suggested 1.5% methylcellulose viscosity tool as..you the microscopist do not function at: ISO of 1/2000 th's. You scan an elongated droplet of your sample on a slide with no applied cover slip...this easy with 4X, 10X, even 20X objectives. When you determine you have target highly mobile organisms to observe...you plop drops of methylcellulose to the wetmount...and then place the rectangular coverslip on this prep. You only feed waters to such a wetmount over the time you then use the slide...not more methycellulose.

You can not track high speed organisms for use of 1/2000 image captures ( unless there is a microscopy Aegis missle system tracking coupled to the mechanical stage, I sense.)...I really appreciate your beautiful and crisp microscopy shared experiences, hkv, I would never suggest awkward placement of methylcellulose to the edge of a coverslip-wetmount prep.

Thank you,hkv for these beautiful protozoan images. Charlie guevara

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Re: Ceratium, Tachysoma & Uroglena

#11 Post by Radazz » Fri Nov 10, 2017 4:18 pm

Exquisite images, thanks for sharing these.
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Re: Ceratium, Tachysoma & Uroglena

#12 Post by vasselle » Fri Nov 10, 2017 5:46 pm

Bonjour
Superbes images.
Et votre boitier Sony à air top.
En tout cas bravo pour votre travail
Cordialement seb
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hkv
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Re: Ceratium, Tachysoma & Uroglena

#13 Post by hkv » Fri Nov 10, 2017 10:00 pm

charlie g wrote:Again, thanks for the specifics on your new SONY with electronic shutter, and high ISO performances,hkv (thanks, Jim T for asking about this).

I suggested 1.5% methylcellulose viscosity tool as..you the microscopist do not function at: ISO of 1/2000 th's. You scan an elongated droplet of your sample on a slide with no applied cover slip...this easy with 4X, 10X, even 20X objectives. When you determine you have target highly mobile organisms to observe...you plop drops of methylcellulose to the wetmount...and then place the rectangular coverslip on this prep. You only feed waters to such a wetmount over the time you then use the slide...not more methycellulose.

You can not track high speed organisms for use of 1/2000 image captures ( unless there is a microscopy Aegis missle system tracking coupled to the mechanical stage, I sense.)...I really appreciate your beautiful and crisp microscopy shared experiences, hkv, I would never suggest awkward placement of methylcellulose to the edge of a coverslip-wetmount prep.

Thank you,hkv for these beautiful protozoan images. Charlie guevara
Thank you Charlie! I will try your proposed procedure. I always put the cover glass on immediatley, but will try your proposed method to browse the slide with at low power without glass to start with.

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Re: Ceratium, Tachysoma & Uroglena

#14 Post by hkv » Fri Nov 10, 2017 10:01 pm

Radazz wrote:Exquisite images, thanks for sharing these.
vasselle wrote:Bonjour
Superbes images.
Et votre boitier Sony à air top.
En tout cas bravo pour votre travail
Cordialement seb
Thanks Radazz and SEB!

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Re: Ceratium, Tachysoma & Uroglenopsis

#15 Post by hkv » Sun Nov 12, 2017 1:27 pm

A fellow forum member suggests the the Uroglena in fact is a close relative, Uroglenopsis. There are actually entire research papers on the topic on how to identify the differences between the two species (!). Looking through the paper, I think Uroglenopsis is the correct ID. I have changed the title of this post accordingly.

https://www.researchgate.net/publicatio ... ysophyceae

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