What is this?

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fibreoptix
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Joined: Tue Jul 17, 2018 7:34 pm

What is this?

#1 Post by fibreoptix » Wed Jul 18, 2018 8:32 pm

One of the most fascinating things I've seen through a scope. It's head retracted and turned into a propeller! Wow. Can anyone identify it?

http://imgur.com/gallery/BrVQWZm

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75RR
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Location: Estepona, Spain

Re: What is this?

#2 Post by 75RR » Wed Jul 18, 2018 9:07 pm

It's head retracted and turned into a propeller!
Curiously that is where it gets its name from ... Rotifer
Zeiss Standard WL (somewhat fashion challenged) & Wild M8
Olympus E-P2 (Micro Four Thirds Camera)

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fibreoptix
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Re: What is this?

#3 Post by fibreoptix » Wed Jul 18, 2018 9:57 pm

No kidding? Ha. I wish i originally discoved it. I would have named it prop head. I was truly blown away when i saw its head retract and swim away rapidly. What a fascinatingly strange creature. I read that they are all female?

EDIT just realized there is a subsection for identification. New here sorry.

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75RR
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Re: What is this?

#4 Post by 75RR » Wed Jul 18, 2018 10:35 pm

I read that they are all female?
I believe that the Bdelloid rotifers are all female - not sure about the others.

In fact I think that is what you photographed.

Here is a link to a Bdelloid key: http://www.atbi.eu/summerschool/files/s ... llabus.pdf

There is some more info on Rotifers in the Resources (online, books etc.) section.
Zeiss Standard WL (somewhat fashion challenged) & Wild M8
Olympus E-P2 (Micro Four Thirds Camera)

GaryB
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Re: What is this?

#5 Post by GaryB » Wed Jul 18, 2018 11:50 pm

Rotifers are pretty awesome, and very widespread so you should be able to find more of them quite easily. They do make good study partners as long as you can get them to stay relatively still. Unlike the simpler pond occupants, they are multi-cellular, have jaws, eyes, brains and twin turboprops to observe. They've kept me busy for quite long periods and are fascinating to watch.

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