Horsefly portrait

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MicroBob
Posts: 2160
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2016 9:11 am
Location: Northern Germany

Horsefly portrait

#1 Post by MicroBob » Sat Jul 04, 2020 7:13 pm

Ho together,
here a potrait of a horsefly, taken with an Olympus TG-4 outdoor camera in "microscope mode" at f=14.
The photo shows how much is possible even with limited equipment.
This is a rugged compact camera I use while paddling. Image quality on these cameras is always limited, probably because of the protective window. I made a microscope adapter too, but with the 40:1 objective the optical limitations become apparent in form of a blotchy background.

Bob
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dtsh
Posts: 74
Joined: Wed May 01, 2019 6:06 pm

Re: Horsefly portrait

#2 Post by dtsh » Sun Jul 05, 2020 4:33 am

Very nice, have any more images from other angles?

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cuxlander
Posts: 125
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2016 12:13 pm

Re: Horsefly portrait

#3 Post by cuxlander » Sun Jul 05, 2020 10:07 am

Hello Bob,
microscope adapter
please tell us about this adapter.

Cheerrs,
Hans

MicroBob
Posts: 2160
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2016 9:11 am
Location: Northern Germany

Re: Horsefly portrait

#4 Post by MicroBob » Sun Jul 05, 2020 4:07 pm

Hi together,
here one more photo, this time from the side. I wasn't able to do a closer identification so far, it is not the ordinary variant.

The TG4 has a bayonett in front of the objective which is normaly covered with a ring. There is a 3D model that fits this bayonett on Thingiverse, but the printed model needed several adjustments to fit properly. The adapter connects a Leitz Periplan 10x18 (this means 160mm tube length version) to the camera objective.

For micro photo purposes the camera is not ideal. As in many compacts there is at least one optical element that shows defects when used with higher power objectives. The image is edited to show the defects, taken with a 40:1 achromat.
There also is a hotspot, probably caused by the flat protective window.

A similar compact solution but much better is the adaptation of a Pentax Q, Nikon 1J5 or probably Oly M43.


Bob
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IMG_20200705_164556-01.jpeg (104.13 KiB) Viewed 99 times
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OI000024-01.jpeg (66.95 KiB) Viewed 99 times
IMG_20200705_164541-01.jpeg
IMG_20200705_164541-01.jpeg (131.32 KiB) Viewed 99 times
OI000030-01.jpeg
OI000030-01.jpeg (87.4 KiB) Viewed 99 times

dtsh
Posts: 74
Joined: Wed May 01, 2019 6:06 pm

Re: Horsefly portrait

#5 Post by dtsh » Mon Jul 06, 2020 1:32 am

I can't tell for sure, but does it have 3 ocelli (simple eyes) at the top of it's head (vertex)? If it does, and the back pair of legs have 2 tiny spurs on the tibia, then I believe it is in the subfamily Pangoniinae.
It looks to be in pretty good condition, the antennae break off easily. The 3 pads on the feet are a Tabanidae feature, pretty neat looking.

DonSchaeffer
Posts: 452
Joined: Sun Mar 22, 2020 10:06 am
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

Re: Horsefly portrait

#6 Post by DonSchaeffer » Mon Jul 06, 2020 2:01 am

I have a small Olympus camera too, the SP350 It's a shame Olympus is getting out of the camera business.

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