Could this be a tardigrade?

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rooth
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2018 8:07 pm

Could this be a tardigrade?

#1 Post by rooth » Sun Feb 10, 2019 9:18 pm

Could this be a tardigrade. I have three photos so you can see the whiskers, his body outline, and the legs. There were three of them in the one sample but this one was in the best shape. (He has clearly seen better days.) I got the sample from an apple tree flower bud that I sliced into last week (in order to look to identify apple powdery mildew spores - Podosphaera leucotricha). 400X total.
Thank you.
rooth
Attachments
190202 my apple tree sliced bud inf thing w whiskers layer three 400X TC.jpg
190202 my apple tree sliced bud inf thing w whiskers layer three 400X TC.jpg (52.67 KiB) Viewed 1696 times
190202 my apple tree sliced bud inf thing w whiskers layer two 400X TC.jpg
190202 my apple tree sliced bud inf thing w whiskers layer two 400X TC.jpg (53.14 KiB) Viewed 1696 times
190202 my apple tree sliced bud inf thing w whiskers layer one 400X TC.jpg
190202 my apple tree sliced bud inf thing w whiskers layer one 400X TC.jpg (52.67 KiB) Viewed 1696 times

charlie g
Posts: 1401
Joined: Mon Oct 20, 2014 7:54 pm

Re: Could this be a tardigrade?

#2 Post by charlie g » Mon Feb 11, 2019 7:00 pm

certainly not a tardigrade. Please describe the manner of this organisms movement..quick and repeated 'spurts of rapid forward motion'...or continuous forward motion? So many insect stages resemble this organism..how did it move?

Due the anterior 'antenae'...possibly a 'water flea'..but you need inform us how active this specimen was/ describe the manner of it's movements...BTW..was it still 'living' when you imaged captured it?

thanks for forum posting, Charlie guevara

rooth
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2018 8:07 pm

Re: Could this be a tardigrade?

#3 Post by rooth » Tue Feb 12, 2019 1:14 am

This gut was not moving at all. I am afraid I did not give him much chance. I was looking for certain spores and dissected a piece of flower bud from a fruit tree and made an infusion. I am sure he was dead as a door nail. I will do another dissection to see if I find another.
You are on to something however. I think it's a better chance that it's some microfauna. What should and could more likely be in that bud is stuff like aphid eggs and larvae and tiny true bugs, etc.
Thank you
rooth

gastrotrichman
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Joined: Mon Nov 12, 2018 4:04 pm
Location: Oregon, USA

Re: Could this be a tardigrade?

#4 Post by gastrotrichman » Tue Feb 12, 2019 4:11 am

I agree with Charlie … not a tardigrade. Could be an appleleaf blister mite. Females overwinter under bud scales. I could not find a good image of an identified appleleaf blister mite, but they are shaped like your critter and are quite small.
gastrotrichman

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rooth
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2018 8:07 pm

Re: Could this be a tardigrade?

#5 Post by rooth » Tue Feb 12, 2019 5:05 am

Way to go gastrotrichman.
Here is a pretty good photo from a research paper.
The link for the paper is on the top of the pdf.
Thanks so much.
rooth
Attachments
page 9 apple leaf blister mites BurtsEverettC1959_Page_13.pdf
(1.19 MiB) Downloaded 86 times

gastrotrichman
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Location: Oregon, USA

Re: Could this be a tardigrade?

#6 Post by gastrotrichman » Tue Feb 12, 2019 5:07 am

It definitely looks like an eriophyid mite. See photomicrographs of some eriophyid mites at https://www.google.com/search?biw=1200& ... UVnbDtSMmQ
gastrotrichman

Nikon Microphot
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Wild M8
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