Chinese microscopes

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Dave S
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Chinese microscopes

#1 Post by Dave S » Thu May 23, 2019 11:37 am

I am keen amateur photographer (https://davesimaging.wixsite.com/mysite), who is looking to extend this interest into photomicroscopy. However, although I have spent many thousands of pounds on photographic equipment. and at one time, telescopes and astro imaging cameras, at this stage I don't want to spend 'big money' on a microscope, in case I find that I don't want to take it further. That said, I don't want a toy, and am setting a budget of circa £300.

There are a multitude of Chinese manufactured microscopes in this price bracket, marketed under a variety of brand names (e.g. AmScope, Omax, Brunel, Swift etc,etc), all cosmetically different, but with pretty much identical specs. Quite likely many will come from the same factory in China. If not sharing the same mechanics, probably sourcing their optics from a single supplier.

In my experience with Telescopes, Chinese, and Taiwanese manufactured products can be very good, while others suffer from lack of quality control, so you can get a good, or not so good one of the same model.

I'm guessing that the same applies to Chinese manufactured Microscopes?

Based on your own experience, and not 'hear say', would you say that any of the mid range Chinese brands are better than others, or is it 'pot luck' with any of them.

I should add that I only want to buy new, and one that comes with at least some sort of warranty against mechanical, and optical defects.

I have a good understanding of optics, and am well aware of the abberations, that come with Achromatic lenses.

Your comments, and thoughts, would be much appreciated.
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Re: Chinese microscopes

#2 Post by apochronaut » Thu May 23, 2019 12:30 pm

If your intention is to photograph through a microscope then it seems that the best strategy is to obtain equipment that limits aberrations as much as possible to provide the image and a camera to capture it that can render the image as accurately as possible. This means an achromatic condenser, fluorite or apochromat objectives and a vibration free camera and mount that hits around the 20 mp mark. This kind of vague advice you probably already know or can extrapolate from your previous experience.

Those kinds of specs. are not available in the price range you are quoting, so what are the options for 300 pounds? As a new instrument, only basic stuff that a veterinary technician would struggle with...certainly not toys but far from anything that would allow you to make fine pictures. Just about any pictures from microscopes in that price range that anyone posts or the retailers present as marketing information, are cropped to remove the peripheral distortions and are of stained subjects, which hide ca and many are heavy with post processing to boot.

If you want to capture decent images with limited introduced distortion or aberration, you pretty much have to base your system on a quality used stand and build a system around it. You still aren't going to hit the 300 pound price tag, likely-----might do, it's possible if you don't get caught in brand avoidance but in order to get the kind of imaging quality in a new instrument that you could be proud of, you will have to go well north of 1000.00 pounds.
Last edited by apochronaut on Thu May 23, 2019 1:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Chinese microscopes

#3 Post by zzffnn » Thu May 23, 2019 12:56 pm

Welcome to the forum, Dave.

There are a few UK microscopy groups. You best option will be buying a quality used scope from group members and try it in person before buying:
http://www.microscopy-uk.org.uk/index.h ... npeop.html

Or go to a nearby surplus auction to buy a quality used scope. Again, they usually would let you try the scope first, before bidding.

Alan Wood is a well know UK microscopist, Olympus expert and often helps other UK microscopists. Email him:
http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/p ... ile&u=1416

You are right in that it is a gamble in buying Chinese scopes. You may get lucky, but if not, return/refund/resale would not be easy and you likely will incur a financial loss. Also, they may not be easy to upgrade, compared to a Zeiss or Olympus scope.

I mostly agree with Apochronaut. Of what he mentioned, you can save a little by not buying the achromatic condenser for now (better condenser may not provide significant image quality upgrade, until you progress further in the hobby).

If you very much enjoy astronomy but cannot get good viewing opportunity (due to light pollution/weather), I suspect you will like microscopy. Take a look at microscopy images posted in this forum: http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/v ... m.php?f=14

They have great field macro and studio macro sections too: http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/v ... m.php?f=27

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Re: Chinese microscopes

#4 Post by Dave S » Thu May 23, 2019 1:17 pm

Thank you for your input 'apochronaut', as a lifelong amateur photographer, and digital from its first appearance, I am indeed very aware, from practical experience of optical shortcomings with budget lenses, for my photography, only shoot with pro-spec lenses, and these don't come cheap, but as the saying goes "you get what you pay for".

In my early astro-imaging days, I started out with achromatic telescopes, but as soon as I found that it was the hobby for me, moved up to apochromatic instruments. The same with astro-imaging cameras, from basic CMOS based cameras to dedicated Peltier cooled CCD camera, costing in excess of £2.5k.

As far as photo microscopy goes, I am '"dipping my toe in the water", and as such want to try it to see if it is a hobby that I want to pursue, hopefully it will be.

It might seem an odd combination to be putting a £3.5k DSLR body on a £300 microscope, but that is where I need to start, without committing a major outlay, and am prepared, at this stage, accept the shortcomings in terms of optical aberration etc. If I find that my interest is inspired, then I would look to buying a higher quality instrument, and possibly donate the budget microscope to the local primary school.

So, given that I am going to buy a £300 'ish' Chinese microscope for starters, my question remains, should it be AmScope, Omax, Brunel, Apex Swift etc, or are the all about the same?

I do know that at one time Swift made good quality microscopes, and these could be found many schools, and colleges. but of course when Swift (UK) ceased production, the name was bough by a Chinese consortium, and they are likely to be a very different 'beast' now. That is not to say that they aren't any good, but they won't be in the same league as Nikon, Leica, and Olympus etc, but neither do they cost the same.
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Re: Chinese microscopes

#5 Post by Dave S » Thu May 23, 2019 1:29 pm

Thank for your welcome 'zzffnn', and wise words.

As with apochranaut's , btw, does anybody here use given names, it all sounds a bit like some sort of CB club :lol: , what you both say is very logical, and a common sense approach for someone venturing into microscopy, but as I said, I don't yet know if it is for me, albeit I hope it will be. I don't mind gambling around £300 ($380 usd) to 'dip my toe in the water', as its no big loss if I don't continue.
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Re: Chinese microscopes

#6 Post by 75RR » Thu May 23, 2019 1:54 pm

I would suggest that you do not buy a microscope yet.

Find a microscopist group within traveling distance and go to a meeting or two.

See if you can get some hands on experience.

Here is a link to a member in Canada that seems to have much the same interests as you do (nature photography and microscopy). You should contact him via his website.

https://www.canadiannaturephotographer.com/sitemap.html
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Re: Chinese microscopes

#7 Post by Dave S » Thu May 23, 2019 2:21 pm

Thank you for the 'link' 75RR
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Re: Chinese microscopes

#8 Post by apochronaut » Thu May 23, 2019 2:29 pm

That's a good option. See if you can try out someone else's instrument at a club meeting or something like that. The U.K. is pretty flush with such.
Don't forget too, that shipping can become a disproportionate percentage of the cost of a cheap microscope. Rather than waste some of your 300 sterling on petrol or diesel, more of it can be put into equipment if you keep your purchase local. Brunel comes to mind in the U.K. There are several U.K. members on this forum that know the circumstance over there better than I and could be of some help.

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Re: Chinese microscopes

#9 Post by Dave S » Thu May 23, 2019 3:14 pm

The only 'pitfall' that I can see with that, is those attending such meetings are likely to be dedicated microscopists, and as such unlikely to have budget equipment. I could find myself looking through a high quality microscope, such as a Nikon, Olympus, or Leica etc, this could set a standard, but one which at this stage I'm not prepared to spend that sort of money on. Plus the fact, if I started lower down the spec level, which is my current intention, I could be extremely disappointed after experiencing a high quality instrument, and end up not pursuing microscopy at all, which would be a shame.

When I started out in photography, some 60 years ago, I started with budget equipment, and learned much as I progressed through to my current 'high end' equipment. When I look back at pictures taken with budget lenses, and compare them t with those taken with my Canon 'L' series lenses, there is a marked difference in image quality. That said in my early days, I thoroughly enjoyed what I produced with my budget gear, and it set me on the road to a lifelong hobby. Provided I can accept the limitations of a budget microscope, and see beyond that, it may well start me on my way to a new hobby. If I jump in at the 'deep end' and spend four figures on a high end microscope, only to find that it is a passing interest, then that could amount to a significant monetary loss.

I guess that forums like this are mainly populated by long time experienced microscopists, and not folk who want to 'dip their toe in the water' before they 'dive in'. For some 12 years, I ran a serious astro-imaging forum, and it was mainly populated by experienced astro imagers, with comprehensive equipment, but we also had 'newbies' who wanted to learn, and we made a point of telling them that we all started at the bottom of the 'learning curve' with basic equipment, and progressed form there.

In terms of popularity, microscopy is way down the pile, compared to astronomy, and is microscopic (excuse the pun ;) ) compared with photography.

Perhaps more could be done to encourage people to take up the hobby. I know that Oliver Kim in the US, attempts to do this, as does Mol Smith in the UK (i.e. Micscape)
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Re: Chinese microscopes

#10 Post by PeteM » Thu May 23, 2019 3:26 pm

Your current camera equipment might influence your choice of a microscope?

If you happen to have a full frame DSLR, then a quality used microscope with a trinocular head and an adapter for your brand of 35mm camera could make a lot of sense. I'd guess half the fun you'll have with a microscope will be taking photos in the micro world. A quality unit, used, is well within your budget. And these used units will have available the best optics, affordable used, for taking full frame 35mm photos. Their better focus mechanisms and rigidity will help with photo stacking - an affordable computer technique for getting incredible depth of field.

With respect to Chinese scopes, Motic is a good name. The mostly-US reseller AmScope tends to source microscopes that are fairly priced and you could find a decent trinocular one right at the top of your budget (something like a T490, with a trinocular head, and be sure to get plan achro objectives). If you buy through Amazon (and from Amazon), they have a fairly liberal return policy in the event you're not happy.

If you want a fairly extensive guide to models and brands, new and used, message me once you have enough posts to do so. I can send a PDF copy to your email address.

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Re: Chinese microscopes

#11 Post by 75RR » Thu May 23, 2019 3:31 pm

Dave S wrote:The only 'pitfall' that I can see with that, is those attending such meetings are likely to be dedicated microscopists, and as such unlikely to have budget equipment. I could find myself looking through a high quality microscope, such as a Nikon, Olympus, or Leica etc, this could set a standard, but one which at this stage I'm not prepared to spend that sort of money on. Plus the fact, if I started lower down the spec level, which is my current intention, I could be extremely disappointed after experiencing a high quality instrument, and end up not pursuing microscopy at all, which would be a shame.

When I started out in photography, some 60 years ago, I started with budget equipment, and learned much as I progressed through to my current 'high end' equipment. When I look back at pictures taken with budget lenses, and compare them t with those taken with my Canon 'L' series lenses, there is a marked difference in image quality. That said in my early days, I thoroughly enjoyed what I produced with my budget gear, and it set me on the road to a lifelong hobby. Provided I can accept the limitations of a budget microscope, and see beyond that, it may well start me on my way to a new hobby. If I jump in at the 'deep end' and spend four figures on a high end microscope, only to find that it is a passing interest, then that could amount to a significant monetary loss.

I guess that forums like this are mainly populated by long time experienced microscopists, and not folk who want to 'dip their toe in the water' before they 'dive in'. For some 12 years, I ran a serious astro-imaging forum, and it was mainly populated by experienced astro imagers, with comprehensive equipment, but we also had 'newbies' who wanted to learn, and we made a point of telling them that we all started at the bottom of the 'learning curve' with basic equipment, and progressed form there.

In terms of popularity, microscopy is way down the pile, compared to astronomy, and is microscopic (excuse the pun ;) ) compared with photography.

Perhaps more could be done to encourage people to take up the hobby. I know that Oliver Kim in the US, attempts to do this, as does Mol Smith in the UK (i.e. Micscape)
The advice given was both good and well meant. Since you seem determined to disregard it ...
So, given that I am going to buy a £300 'ish' Chinese microscope for starters, my question remains, should it be AmScope, Omax, Brunel, Apex Swift etc, or are the all about the same?
All about the same
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Re: Chinese microscopes

#12 Post by zzffnn » Thu May 23, 2019 3:41 pm

Dave,

You can call me Fan (which is my first name).

You may want to think about resale value, in case you don't like microscopy. A used Zeiss scope may be bought from a hobbyist for 300 GBP, and would retain its resale value much better than a used Chinese scope.

Or buy a used Chinese scope at deep discount price. Amscope T490 or a Motic is a good start.

But look into microscopy clubs first and insists on your budget. 300 GBP can get you a good used scope (Nikon, Olympus, American Optical Spencer) locally in a USA city, if you are patient.

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Re: Chinese microscopes

#13 Post by Scarodactyl » Thu May 23, 2019 3:48 pm

Microscopy is a little different wrt used vs new. There may not be a whole lot of universities and businesses buying telescopes and high end camera lenses (for ff anyway), but of course there are with microscopes. They buy tons and pay top dollar. And then for a variety of reasons they end up surplusing them off for pennies on the dollar a decade or so later. This warps the whole used market. Buying new you get what you pay for, buying used you get what they paid for. You can skip the low end and jump in at a higher tier because businesses and universities sometimes work on weird fairyland logic (or more realistically their needs are often different than ours, so while good optics are still good there are shiny new features they need). It is kind of dumb and it works massively in our favor. That's not to say it doesn't have risks but the rewards are really rewarding. You probably won't get an awful scope by any means buying new from China, but your money could go a lot further.

I don't mean to harp on too much, though. Whatever you choose I hope you'll post about it.

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Re: Chinese microscopes

#14 Post by Dave S » Thu May 23, 2019 5:02 pm

75RR, I didn't see the advice given, as anything other than helpful and well meant, but for me it doesn't fit, and its not a matter of my being determined to ignore it.

Within sensible limits, cost is not an issue, and I could go out tomorrow and spend a couple £k on a high end microscope. God knows I have spent thousands on photography, and astronomy.

However, that is not the point, as I thought I had made clear. At this stage I am not sure that I will enjoy microscopy, in the same way as I enjoy and photogarphy, and did astronomy/astroimaging. Therefore it would be stupid to spend 'big bucks' on a microscope, if a little way down the road, I find that its not for me. If I spend £300 on an instrument, and microscopy doesn't inspire me, then very little investment is lost. I would probably donate it to the local school.

If however, I 'get hooked', then I will move up the quality ladder.

Lewis Hamilton started his career racing with a cheap GoKart, before progressing through the various formulas. He didn't jump straight into Formula 1.

BTW, I always buy new, and that includes cars. Financial nonsense yes, but I enjoy not having to worry about its history, and if if goes wrong, its covered by warranty.

I came to this forum, to ask if there was anything to choose between the various dealer branded Chinese microscopes, and you have answered that question, saying "they are all about the same".

Hopefully, I will be inspired by microscopy, and go to join the ranks of those with prestige microscopes.
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Re: Chinese microscopes

#15 Post by Hobbyst46 » Thu May 23, 2019 6:13 pm

Hi Dave S and welcome.

May I suggest a test that might aid you choose the best way to go.

First, locate those importers or distributors or suppliers of new microscopes, within the budget you allocated, that provide not only warranty, but proven rock-steady customer service. Since this is the meaning of buying new rather than used.

Second, obtain some prepared slides, or prepare your own. Remembering apochronaut's warning about misleading, often stained sample slides, get some professionally made slides. Say, from a clinic or a university research lab library. A faculty of medicine might provide unonimous old data slides that they no longer need. Or, you can make some slides of low-contrast samples on your own. Like plant tissue cells, cheek epidermis cells, diatoms, or anything from the family of things that you find interesting right now. After all, the first thing to do when you have a microscope is obtain slides to observe (unless one is a collector...). Take the slides to the microscope, inspect and photograph them.

Judge according to the results.

And, whatever brand, I would only buy a trinocular microscope.
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Re: Chinese microscopes

#16 Post by Dave S » Thu May 23, 2019 6:35 pm

Thank you for your input Scarodactyl.

As I said to 75RR, its not a matter of cost, but more will microscopy inspire me enough to pursue it, and as I said £300 is not a 'big deal', and if I decide to upgrade, I likely wouldn't bother trying to sell it, but donate it to the local school.

At this stage I'm not too concerned about the quality of the microscope, as long as its not a 'toy', but more as to whether the subject matter grabs my interest. Hopefully it will, and I will set the bar higher.

What I was hoping for, as a one or two people havedone, is that people would come forward with their own personal experience of particular Branded Chinese microscopes, and whether or not they were "ok", leave well alone.

Like many things in life, some people will decry something, without having any personal experience of it, but more from 'hear say'.

If someone asks me about a telescopes, astro-imaging cameras, or photography, I will advise them based on my own personal experience, having owned and used it.

For example, I had 8", 10", and 12" Meade telescopes, and know what they are capable of producing. On the other hand, I wouldn't comment on the Celestron equivalents, as I have never used them.

A few years back. a nephew of mine had a Chinese microscope, with a Brunel badge on it, and I seem to remember that apart from a bit of Chroma, the resolution, at least up to 400x was pretty good. That of course is not to say that Brunel is any better than AmScope, Swift, Apex. Omax etc, as they likely all emanate from the same factory.

So, I will in the absence, of any further Chinese brand recommendations, 'bob for the apple", and see what out. If it is rubbish, I will say so, if its reasonable value for money, I will say so. I am far from 'wet behind the ears' when it comes to optics, so any comments that I make will be factual.
Last edited by Dave S on Thu May 23, 2019 9:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Chinese microscopes

#17 Post by Dave S » Thu May 23, 2019 6:50 pm

Hi Hobbys46, and thank you for your welcome.

There are two such suppliers in the UK that I am aware of, and they are Brunel, and GT Vision. Both import Chinese microscopes, and put their own badge on them.

From what I have been told, both of these companies have their own quality control procedure, whereby they check each item before it is sent out, and any mechanical, or misalignment issue (e.g. condenser) is sorted before dispatch.

That said, I know of one case of a Brunel badged microscope that slipped through their QC net, but on its return, they dealt with it appropriately, so good customer service.

I am aware of a similar response from GT Vison.

I am only considering a Tri-Ocular microscope.

Buying Chinese can be a bit of a minefield, but its not all bad, you just have to get lucky.
Last edited by Dave S on Thu May 23, 2019 9:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Chinese microscopes

#18 Post by Dave S » Thu May 23, 2019 7:05 pm

I have to say, that having joined a couple of other microscopy/photomicrography forums, this one has been the most welcoming, and responsive.

Something I am sure Oliver Kim will be pleased to hear. :)
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Re: Chinese microscopes

#19 Post by Roldorf » Thu May 23, 2019 8:27 pm

Quote from Wikipedia "Bresser GmbH was founded by Josef Bresser in 1957. The company began by specializing in the import and distribution of binoculars. Rolf Bresser sold his father's business in 1999 to the American company Meade Instruments in Irvine, California, the company operating under Meade Instruments Europe GmbH until 2009, when it was acquired by former owner Rolf Bresser, its general manager, Helmut Ebbert, and Chinese manufacturer Jinghua Optical Electronics Co., Ltd. (JOC)."

They supply a wide range of microscopes from budget to models costing almost 4000 euro and have an UK website: https://www.bresseruk.com/microscopes.html
This one could be in your price range: https://www.bresseruk.com/bresser-trino ... scope.html

Got to be worth a look.
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Re: Chinese microscopes

#20 Post by Dave S » Thu May 23, 2019 9:16 pm

Ah, so the Bresser link was with Meade, and not Celestron, I knew there was a link with a major telescope brand, thanks for that info a Roldorf.

I'm fairly convinced that whichever "brand" of mid range Chinese scope I buy, it will very likely have come from the same factory. If not the metalwork, the optics even more likely.
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Re: Chinese microscopes

#21 Post by Dave S » Thu May 23, 2019 9:26 pm

Apologies PeteM, I just realised that I didn't respond to your input.

As you say, Amazon do have a good returns policy. I have an account with Amazon, and get next day free delivery on most things.

They do offer most of the Chinese microscopes discussed in this 'thread", so yes, I could buy through them, and if I find it less than satisfactory, return it.
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Re: Chinese microscopes

#22 Post by Roldorf » Thu May 23, 2019 9:47 pm

As regards "warranty" I bought direct from Bresser on one of their "open days", went down to their distribution center in Rhede Germany as I wanted to 'try before buy' and look at the differences between the microscopes and objectives. All their offerings were on display and hooked up to large display screens with cameras. Had a great day and ...... I brought the microscope of my choice home with me (I didn't want to trust my new microscope to the 'not so gentle hands' of DHL) complete with a 10 year warranty.
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Re: Chinese microscopes

#23 Post by Dave S » Thu May 23, 2019 10:13 pm

That sounds like the ideal shopping trip Roldorf. I would very much enjoy that.

You are obviously pleased with your Bresser microscope, which is good to hear, and the Bresser remains on my shopping list.

One UK retailer, GT vision, is about 30 mins drive from me, another is Brunel, but they are about three to four hours away. You can visit them, but only by appointment. I think they are more warehouse based than a shop.

I'm not sure about the taxes in Germany, but here VAT adds 20 percent to pretty much everythihg we buy. When first introduced it was 12 percent if I remember correctly.
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Re: Chinese microscopes

#24 Post by Dave S » Thu May 23, 2019 10:28 pm

Amazon stock this model Bresser, do you recognise it Roldorf ?

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00 ... 39548JVRZR

The only negative is that uses a Halogen bulb to illumination, and not LED.

LEDs provide a much brighter light than a 20W halogen bulb, probably more more significant at higher mag.

Halogen would also generate heat, which would tend to dry out a wet slide.
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Re: Chinese microscopes

#25 Post by apochronaut » Thu May 23, 2019 10:40 pm

Since you have been involved with telescopes, I thought I would pass this along but you are already probably aware of this critical difference between microscopes and telescopes. It is one thing that many telescope users miss, when they switch over to microscopes and it can cause a bit of confusion because they are used to changing eyepieces to change the instrument's performance. You can't just do that without some careful thought and precautions on a microscope. I write this for any novice moving over from the telescope to the microscope, because I'm sure there are or are going to be some reading this thread.

To compare the two instruments directly as instruments to view something, each with an objective lens and an eyelens, the mode of use for each is somewhat reversed.

A microscope is actually several individual instruments attached to the same frame, depending on however many objectives it has. You could have an achromat, a fluorite and an apochromat, all in one stand, each coordinated to work with the same eyepiece but more often the degree of corrections of the objectives are similar and it is only the focal length or magnification that is different. The average microscope is basically 3 different size refractors all on one frame. Modifications of magnification and of corrective capacity are made by changing the objectives usually, and occasionally eyepieces too, as long as they are specifically coordinated to the objective being used or are a close acceptable match. In certain situations there are even reflecting objectives, so one can have a reflecting microscope as well. It is an array of different objectives on one stand that provides the user of a microscope, with a broader magnifying capability in general. Light gathering capacity and therefore resolving power is determined by the acceptance angle of an objective lens, plus the corrective capacity built into the coordinated optical combination.

With a telescope, the situation is generally reversed. You have to have several individual instruments and therefore objectives in their own frame, in order to equate to a microscope with a rotating nosepiece. It is an array of different eyepieces that provides the user of a telescope with a broader magnifying capacity, while using a single objective. Light gathering capacity and therefore resolving power is determined by the diameter of the objective lens, plus the corrective capacity built into the coordinated optical combination.

Hobbyst46
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Re: Chinese microscopes

#26 Post by Hobbyst46 » Fri May 24, 2019 6:56 am

Dave S wrote:Amazon stock this model Bresser, do you recognise it Roldorf ?

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00 ... 39548JVRZR

The only negative is that uses a Halogen bulb to illumination, and not LED.

LEDs provide a much brighter light than a 20W halogen bulb, probably more more significant at higher mag.

Halogen would also generate heat, which would tend to dry out a wet slide.
Note, the following specs are from the link to the Bresser:

"Features: ·Bright LED lighting ·Achromatic DIN lens ·Coaxial cross-table with vernier ·Suitable PC-ocular ·Dimmable lighting.

Technical Specifications: Dimensions: (L x W x H) 280 mm x 360 x 175 · Magnification: 40x - 1000 x · Operating voltage: 230V / AC · Product Specifications: Type: Transmitted light · Head: Trinocular · Eyepiece: WF 10x (Ø 23 mm) (pair) · DIN lens: 4x, 10x, 40x, 100x oil · Light: 20 W Halogen (Dimmable) · Condenser: Abbe N.A. 1.25."

IMO, this description is given by the manufacturer, not Amazon or the firm in Germany.

So I suggest to try and decipher, which lamp is really on the microscope - LED or halogen. If halogen, I believe it will not be Kohler's illumination (disadvantage). I would then check about the price of replacement bulbs, availability etc.

If it is LED, I am not sure about the brightness, especially for darkfield and phase contrast (which are potential upgrades according to the description on the list). I would inquire on the color temperature and how the camera handles it. And how the LED is dimmed, since, if it is PWM dimming, banding can be expected at very short photo exposures.
Zeiss Standard GFL+Canon EOS-M10, Olympus VMZ stereo

Roldorf
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Re: Chinese microscopes

#27 Post by Roldorf » Fri May 24, 2019 7:35 am

Model number 5723100 is listed both on Bresser's English and German website.

English Bresser https://www.bresseruk.com/microscopes/s ... scope.html
German https://www.bresser.de/Mikroskopie/Mikr ... oskop.html.

With the German site showing that it comes with dimmable LED lighting (Dimmbare LED Beleuchtung)

All have the same part number 5723100

If you scroll down to the bottom of the Amazon page below customers also shopped for there is a product description from Amazon which states that it has LED lighting:-

""Product description
Highlights: ·Trinocular

Features: ·Bright LED lighting ·Achromatic DIN lens ·Coaxial cross-table with vernier ·Suitable PC-ocular ·Dimmable lighting.

Technical Specifications: Dimensions: (L x W x H) 280 mm x 360 x 175 · Magnification: 40x - 1000 x · Operating voltage: 230V / AC · Product Specifications: Type: Transmitted light · Head: Trinocular · Eyepiece: WF 10x (Ø 23 mm) (pair) · DIN lens: 4x, 10x, 40x, 100x oil · Light: 20 W Halogen (Dimmable) · Condenser: Abbe N.A. 1.25.

Description: The BRESSER Researcher is an outstanding microscope for school and studies. This microscope is perfectly suitable for laboratory use. The new design of this BRESSER Microscope was inspired by the successful model BRESSER BioScience. The bright LED light provides perfect lighting even with high zoom levels and captivates with its extreme durability.""


If when it arrives from Amazon, if that's where you decide to spend your money and it doesn't have LED lighting, you can return it. The power supply for those with LED lighting has a rated output of DC 5v 1A.
I have made a battery pack with 4 rechargeable's so I can still use the microscope in the field. I tried to use one of those backup batteries that you get for phones but the led light doesn't draw enough power and the backup turns itself off thinking that whatever it was charging has now charged.

Hope this helps. You could also contact Bresser in the UK to see if they know about the lighting on the scope.
Location: Northern Germany

Unknown Brand: Optika SFX 91: Bresser Science Infinity: Canon 4000d
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Dave S
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Re: Chinese microscopes

#28 Post by Dave S » Fri May 24, 2019 10:58 am

Thanks Roldorf, very informative.

The Bresser is definitely my 'short list'.

As has been discussed in this 'thread', I don't think it matters whose name it carries, they are all sourced from China, and its only the degree of quality control that decides whether you get a good one, one that's below par.

When was into astronomy/astro imaging, I bought a Chinese built hobby lathe (Circa £400), to make and thread various telescope, and camera adapters, and it did the job perfectly. The market leading branded equivalents started from £1000, and upwards.

I guess many people of my generation, remember the "Made in Hong Kong" rubbish, but China has come a long way in the technology manufacturing business.

Although all of my photography gear is Canon Pro Spec, I wanted a radio frequency wireless flash system, to fire two remote flash units. As it was something that I wouldn't use very often, I decided in this instance not to buy the very expensive Canon units. Instead I bought the Chinese made Yongnuo system, at a fraction of the price, and I can honestly say, that they are excellent.
Suffolk, UK

Brunel SP100 (with 4x, 10x, 40x,60x, and 100x (oil) plan objectives), and Canon EOS 4000d Camera (microscopy use only)

apochronaut
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Re: Chinese microscopes

#29 Post by apochronaut » Fri May 24, 2019 11:15 am

He might want to see how much extra they want for plan optics. Photographs through simple achromat systems, especially when one expects to match the camera field with the visual field as closely as possible, like many people do , can be really restrictive. Lateral ca is usually exaggerated and flare and coma are common problems. Dave S presents himself as a seasoned photographer with an eye for quality. For a few extra pounds he will save himself considerable frustration.

Roldorf
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Location: Northern Germany

Re: Chinese microscopes

#30 Post by Roldorf » Fri May 24, 2019 12:03 pm

Just reading through my last post and the description I pasted from amazon is contradictory. At the top it says 'bright led lighting', then on the technical specs it says '20W Halogen (Dimmable)'. Then again under description it says 'The bright LED light provides perfect lighting'.

Very confusing. The German website makes it perfectly clear that it has LED lighting.
You Could contact Amazon UK customer service on 0800 496 1081 if you are in the UK, you haven't said where you a located in the world. :?
Location: Northern Germany

Unknown Brand: Optika SFX 91: Bresser Science Infinity: Canon 4000d
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