Mental struggles and microscopy

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Dmi3n
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Mental struggles and microscopy

#1 Post by Dmi3n » Sun Jan 17, 2021 9:49 pm

Good time of day everyone, today I want to bring something rather rare discussed out of the closet. Some time ago I've been diagnosed with schyzotypal personality disorder. For those who don't know it is a very complex disorder which affects the very way I see the world around me. Sympthoms (in my case) include severe social anxiety, thought disorder, paranoid ideation, derealization, depressive and manic episodes. This wasn't a big surprise as I have been questioning my state of menthal health for quite some time. Still, it is rather frightening. They say it is practically incurable but most of the sypthoms can be relieved with help of medications and extensive psychotherapy. And of course, having a hobby helps a lot. Unfortunately, here in Russia where I happen to live there is still very much discrimination towards mentally ill people. The theme of mental ilnesses itlefs is often tabooed, so most of the time it's easier and safer to try to hide the fact of the ilness, which can be very hard at times. And of course, there is a very big problem to find a decent job. There are some miserable allowances (less than 200$\month) but they are not for everybody and even to get them you need to pass seven circles of bureucratic hell which I have unfortunately failed. So the only choice I saw was self-employment. Some day I'll open a jewelry/fine mechanics workshop, but now I am stuck at selling stuff on the Internet. Also my relatives support me a lot, thanks to them I have all the basics needed for survival and even a little more. As I already said, having a hobby really helps. It motivates me to move forward, learn new skills and at least for some time escape the grip of disorder. Microscopes and the world seen through them have always fascinated me. I've went to learn as a turning\milling machinist only to be able to manufacture new and fix old microscope parts. So, I have a question. Are there any people with similar issues here? It will be very interesting to read your stories. I hope such themes are not tabooed here, if anything is wrong I'll delete the post.
Scopes: CZJ NfPk w/ 45mm apo objectives, Phv phase contrast, Epi Pol illuminator, trinocular head, CZJ Epityp-2 Pol (currently dismantled for full restoration and recollimation) w/ D32 microhardness tester and photomicrography attachment.

ScienceMatters
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Re: Mental struggles and microscopy

#2 Post by ScienceMatters » Sun Jan 17, 2021 10:14 pm

Hi! That sounds difficult, but I’m glad you have found this fascinating hobby. Although I don’t have any diagnosed mental illnesses, microscopy and this forum, along with the Amateur Microscopy group on Facebook, have been a great comfort to me during these difficult times. I’m sure we are not alone in that. Feeling the connection to other life all around us, and to other people who feel that connection too, makes everything so much more bearable and meaningful. I wish you well and good luck to you. <3

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Re: Mental struggles and microscopy

#3 Post by Dmi3n » Sun Jan 17, 2021 10:41 pm

ScienceMatters wrote:
Sun Jan 17, 2021 10:14 pm
Hi! That sounds difficult, but I’m glad you have found this fascinating hobby. Although I don’t have any diagnosed mental illnesses, microscopy and this forum, along with the Amateur Microscopy group on Facebook, have been a great comfort to me during these difficult times. I’m sure we are not alone in that. Feeling the connection to other life all around us, and to other people who feel that connection too, makes everything so much more bearable and meaningful. I wish you well and good luck to you. <3
Thank you very much for the kind words. The connection - not only between people but between infinitely small and infinitely big worlds is very important.
Scopes: CZJ NfPk w/ 45mm apo objectives, Phv phase contrast, Epi Pol illuminator, trinocular head, CZJ Epityp-2 Pol (currently dismantled for full restoration and recollimation) w/ D32 microhardness tester and photomicrography attachment.

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Re: Mental struggles and microscopy

#4 Post by DonSchaeffer » Sun Jan 17, 2021 11:07 pm

Do you think people outside of Russia see things differently? Your work and interests seem eminently healthy to me. Best wishes!

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Re: Mental struggles and microscopy

#5 Post by Dmi3n » Sun Jan 17, 2021 11:12 pm

DonSchaeffer wrote:
Sun Jan 17, 2021 11:07 pm
Do you think people outside of Russia see things differently? Your work and interests seem eminently healthy to me. Best wishes!
Thanks a lot! I always thought that outside of Russia and post-Soviet countries people see mental issues differently, maybe less critical.
Scopes: CZJ NfPk w/ 45mm apo objectives, Phv phase contrast, Epi Pol illuminator, trinocular head, CZJ Epityp-2 Pol (currently dismantled for full restoration and recollimation) w/ D32 microhardness tester and photomicrography attachment.

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Re: Mental struggles and microscopy

#6 Post by tgss » Sun Jan 17, 2021 11:33 pm

For quite a number of years now in my country, and I think in many, if not most western countries, mental health issues have been increasingly identified as a relatively common and serious area of concern, not just for the individuals affected but for society as a whole. There is growing concern about the shortage of mental health professionals to treat and support those suffering from mental health issues and, I think, a growing acceptance that mental health problems should not be seen as fundamentally different from other types of ill health. That being the case we are starting to see serious efforts to increase the accessibility of mental health services and to provide increased funding to support these efforts. Mental health problems are clearly more common than the average person used to believe, and perhaps are becoming more so? I think I can understand why a hobby like microscopy might provide some relief and comfort during dark days, and I hope that those on the forum who have similar issues as you can share their experiences with you, either through the forum or by PM. Hopefully the emphasis on mental health treatment will grow in your country too in the not too distant future.
Tom W.

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Re: Mental struggles and microscopy

#7 Post by Hobbyst46 » Mon Jan 18, 2021 8:49 am

Turning/milling is IMO a great skill, in which one can become an expert and produce highly precise items, depending on motivation and will to excel. Furthermore, turning and milling are creativity, and I believe they can become a hobby as well. Although 3D printing is here, making quality and precise pieces out of quality materials is still unique. Combining such activity with microscopy is great. With modern communication, it is possible for everyone to feel and see himself/herself a valuable member of a community. Stay safe !
Zeiss Standard GFL+Canon EOS-M10, Olympus VMZ stereo

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Re: Mental struggles and microscopy

#8 Post by Dmi3n » Mon Jan 18, 2021 10:23 am

Hobbyst46 wrote:
Mon Jan 18, 2021 8:49 am
Turning/milling is IMO a great skill, in which one can become an expert and produce highly precise items, depending on motivation and will to excel. Furthermore, turning and milling are creativity, and I believe they can become a hobby as well. Although 3D printing is here, making quality and precise pieces out of quality materials is still unique. Combining such activity with microscopy is great. With modern communication, it is possible for everyone to feel and see himself/herself a valuable member of a community. Stay safe !
Thanks!

As far as I am concerned, 3d-printers are not too good in printing threads, especially small pitch ones. My last project (optic fiber illuminator mod for Nf) had 0,5mm pitch thread, for example - and also some parts for the same project must be made of brass or aluminum to dissipate heat from the lamp. Although I am thinking about the combination of 3D - printing and vacuum metal casting as a solution for more difficult parts or even jewelry. Unfortunately at the moment I can't afford neither the printer nor the casting equipment, I am looking forward to this.
Scopes: CZJ NfPk w/ 45mm apo objectives, Phv phase contrast, Epi Pol illuminator, trinocular head, CZJ Epityp-2 Pol (currently dismantled for full restoration and recollimation) w/ D32 microhardness tester and photomicrography attachment.

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Re: Mental struggles and microscopy

#9 Post by jfiresto » Mon Jan 18, 2021 12:00 pm

Dmi3n wrote:
Mon Jan 18, 2021 10:23 am
As far as I am concerned, 3d-printers are not too good in printing threads, especially small pitch ones. My last project (optic fiber illuminator mod for Nf) had 0,5mm pitch thread, for example - and also some parts for the same project must be made of brass or aluminum to dissipate heat from the lamp....
We have printed some 3D parts, in both ABS and PLA, to screw on to the M52x1mm threads of a Wild M7A/M7S objective. I am itching to get some time on a lathe to machine some thread adapters in leaded brass – before Brussels outlaws the stuff. I have read that it machines like a dream and produces beautiful chips.
-John

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Re: Mental struggles and microscopy

#10 Post by Dmi3n » Mon Jan 18, 2021 12:35 pm

jfiresto wrote:
Mon Jan 18, 2021 12:00 pm
Dmi3n wrote:
Mon Jan 18, 2021 10:23 am
As far as I am concerned, 3d-printers are not too good in printing threads, especially small pitch ones. My last project (optic fiber illuminator mod for Nf) had 0,5mm pitch thread, for example - and also some parts for the same project must be made of brass or aluminum to dissipate heat from the lamp....
We have printed some 3D parts, in both ABS and PLA, to screw on to the M52x1mm threads of a Wild M7A/M7S objective. I am itching to get some time on a lathe to machine some thread adapters in leaded brass – before Brussels outlaws the stuff. I have read that it machines like a dream and produces beautiful chips.
Yes, leaded brass produces wonderful long chips. Unfortunately it is a rare guest at the scrapyard where I buy most of my metal - usually it is common zinc brass which machines good but chips are small almost like sawdust and fly everywhere :lol:
Scopes: CZJ NfPk w/ 45mm apo objectives, Phv phase contrast, Epi Pol illuminator, trinocular head, CZJ Epityp-2 Pol (currently dismantled for full restoration and recollimation) w/ D32 microhardness tester and photomicrography attachment.

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Re: Mental struggles and microscopy

#11 Post by apochronaut » Mon Jan 18, 2021 2:44 pm

To go back to the original post. I have a 39 year old daughter who I engage sometimes in microscopy. She is very interested in nature ; insects, birds, all kinds of animals but not so much very small things . I have set here up with her choice of the stereo microscopes I have but she seldom takes to it unless I am doing something with one.
She was born with a little understood or known genetic syndrome caused by a fragmented gene, at least that is my understanding. This wasn't discovered until the advent of genome sequencing. On top of that she has asperger's and an extreme obsessive compulsive disorder. These may be part of the genetic complex. In addition, cognitive testing when she was 4, revealed that she is almost entirely right brained. Her birth was 40 hours long and she may have had a stroke during birth, resulting in that . Probably due to repeated misunderstanding of her by incompetent teachers and abuse by fellow students she began developing paranoid schiziphrenia and manic depression around the age of 16.

While as interesting a diversion as microscopy can be and well in line with her interests, nothing trumps the dominance of her own inner workings when they all combine and the miracles of modern biochemistry seem like miniscule fairytale concoctions to combat them.
Canada, often held up as one of the paragons of social democracy , with it's universal health care system , fair immigration policy and reasonably heathy economy has failed her. She gets no access to talk therapy or a psychologist unless paid for out of pocket ; which she desparately needs. Our vaunted health care system, is cookie cutter. She gets access to a psychiatrist but since she is at the least , dual diagnosis and more likely triple or quadruple ( look up dual diagnosis), Canada does not train psychiatrists in dual diagnosis. We have been lucky enough to find a psychiatrist trained in the U.K. , where dual diagnosis is part of the psychiatric curriculum but still the resorting to chemistry as the front line method of treatment is rampant here and I would suspectbe, in most other places too. Interesting to read several of the well intentioned but glib comments. I can assure you that you have no idea how out of touch with reality they are.
Dmi3n. Milling sounds like a really good pastime, maybe even profession for you. I can see the benefit of shaping and creating. Having control, as a foil against the lack of. I could see such a pastime positively affecting my daughter too but keeping her attention away from her self absorption is so difficult. We have tried many options but it ultimately ends up becoming a battle for her attention. Which will triumph, work or pastime at hand or the inner thoughts. Sometimes with microscopy or the planets, the subject at hand becomes to close to the self and it has a negative effect. It is the creative mind on the loose without the tempering of the logical mind to keep a balance.

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Re: Mental struggles and microscopy

#12 Post by Dmi3n » Mon Jan 18, 2021 4:21 pm

apochronaut wrote:
Mon Jan 18, 2021 2:44 pm
To go back to the original post. I have a 39 year old daughter who I engage sometimes in microscopy. She is very interested in nature ; insects, birds, all kinds of animals but not so much very small things . I have set here up with her choice of the stereo microscopes I have but she seldom takes to it unless I am doing something with one.
She was born with a little understood or known genetic syndrome caused by a fragmented gene, at least that is my understanding. This wasn't discovered until the advent of genome sequencing. On top of that she has asperger's and an extreme obsessive compulsive disorder. These may be part of the genetic complex. In addition, cognitive testing when she was 4, revealed that she is almost entirely right brained. Her birth was 40 hours long and she may have had a stroke during birth, resulting in that . Probably due to repeated misunderstanding of her by incompetent teachers and abuse by fellow students she began developing paranoid schiziphrenia and manic depression around the age of 16.

While as interesting a diversion as microscopy can be and well in line with her interests, nothing trumps the dominance of her own inner workings when they all combine and the miracles of modern biochemistry seem like miniscule fairytale concoctions to combat them.
Canada, often held up as one of the paragons of social democracy , with it's universal health care system , fair immigration policy and reasonably heathy economy has failed her. She gets no access to talk therapy or a psychologist unless paid for out of pocket ; which she desparately needs. Our vaunted health care system, is cookie cutter. She gets access to a psychiatrist but since she is at the least , dual diagnosis and more likely triple or quadruple ( look up dual diagnosis), Canada does not train psychiatrists in dual diagnosis. We have been lucky enough to find a psychiatrist trained in the U.K. , where dual diagnosis is part of the psychiatric curriculum but still the resorting to chemistry as the front line method of treatment is rampant here and I would suspectbe, in most other places too. Interesting to read several of the well intentioned but glib comments. I can assure you that you have no idea how out of touch with reality they are.
Dmi3n. Milling sounds like a really good pastime, maybe even profession for you. I can see the benefit of shaping and creating. Having control, as a foil against the lack of. I could see such a pastime positively affecting my daughter too but keeping her attention away from her self absorption is so difficult. We have tried many options but it ultimately ends up becoming a battle for her attention. Which will triumph, work or pastime at hand or the inner thoughts. Sometimes with microscopy or the planets, the subject at hand becomes to close to the self and it has a negative effect. It is the creative mind on the loose without the tempering of the logical mind to keep a balance.
Reading you story really made me feel out of touch with reality. I have always seen Canada as a better place, even for some time thought of immigration. The problem of incompetent teachers and toxic student community in schools is very familiar to me too - to the point that when I was 15 I almost dropped out of school. I really hope your daughter gets better. Have you tried to interest her in photography? I really love birds too and spent countless hours past summer and autumn "hunting" them with my camera and old telephoto objective, forgetting about my issues for quite some time.
Scopes: CZJ NfPk w/ 45mm apo objectives, Phv phase contrast, Epi Pol illuminator, trinocular head, CZJ Epityp-2 Pol (currently dismantled for full restoration and recollimation) w/ D32 microhardness tester and photomicrography attachment.

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Re: Mental struggles and microscopy

#13 Post by tgss » Mon Jan 18, 2021 6:36 pm

apochronaut wrote
Interesting to read several of the well intentioned but glib comments. I can assure you that you have no idea how out of touch with reality they are.
I cannot imagine the heartaches that apochronaut and his daughter have had to face, and I have great sympathy for them and the rest of their family.

I don't want to drive this discussion too far off topic (microscopy) but as a Canadian I suspect I am an offender, or perhaps the sole offender, with regard to misjudgement of the Canadian psychiatric system. If that is the case then I want to clarify that my post in no way was intended to suggest that all is rosy in that system. The report today regarding events at Humber River Hospital make that clear. It is understaffed, it is underfunded, and my remarks touched on that. But recently there has been, it seems to me, a groundswell of opinion both identifying these shortcomings and demanding improvement. This is likely to have a positive effect, not quickly, as these things are never quick, but it will happen. I don't have hard evidence but I suspect that Dmi3n's situation is probably less optimistic. He may wish to comment on that and set me straight if I am wrong.

I do not have apochronaut's experience dealing with psychiatric medicine in Canada, but I still think it a little unfair, and I suspect others might too if they have been included as offenders, to have my post described as somehow insincere or shallow, although I respect the fact that apochronaut was probably writing somewhat emotionally in the circumstances.

Enough said. I hope that apochronaut and his daughter, and Dmi3n, have rosier days ahead, and that IS well meant, and I hope not seen as glib?
Tom W.

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Re: Mental struggles and microscopy

#14 Post by Leitzcycler » Mon Jan 18, 2021 8:00 pm

I think there are a lot of scientists who feel nature and research is more interesting than the company of other people. I say company, as what people do or what they feel and think may still be interesting as such. I would call this state of personality introvertism. I share myself your feelings and thoughts what comes to being an introvert. The diagnosis of schyzotypal personality disorder seem to include similar elements though in more serious form. In some cases, diagnoses might be like a line drawn in water, in some cases they are more clear. As more information is available the more we will understand mental health is part of our physical appearance with its genetic and environmental background. I hope this knowledge will help all of us to understand and accept ourselves and other people.

I have been an introvert all of my life and also suffer from many difficulties in the extrovert-dominating society. I also faced much social trouble at school for many years which had very negative effect on my mental and social development. Interest in science and hobby crafts was my way to survive. Microscopy is one part of this.

As I live in eastern Finland very close to Russian border I have travelled there a lot, mainly in Lake Ladoga and St.Petersburg area. My wife even spent some months as an exchange student in St.Petersburg. So I might understand also something about that part of your story. I was also a Lomo-user, though using now Leitz and Olympus. I still have my Lomo Biolam which I bought as university surplus when I was a biochemistry student in early 90’s.

This is an excellent forum with great people and huge amount of knowledge. I am here to learn. However, being here also helps me mentally a lot in my loneliness: I am a former university researcher and now unemployed so I have missed the natural contact to the scientific community. I hate the definition “unemployed” as I am working all the time, with very limited resources of course.

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Re: Mental struggles and microscopy

#15 Post by Dmi3n » Tue Jan 19, 2021 8:38 am

Leitzcycler wrote:
Mon Jan 18, 2021 8:00 pm
The diagnosis of schyzotypal personality disorder seem to include similar elements though in more serious form...
...I have been an introvert all of my life and also suffer from many difficulties in the extrovert-dominating society. I also faced much social trouble at school for many years which had very negative effect on my mental and social development. Interest in science and hobby crafts was my way to survive. Microscopy is one part of this.
Thank you for you story. Yes, I am an introvert too and sometimes it grows into something bigger such as sociophobia and tendency to self-isolation. Last time I visited large city I could barely use the underground metro because of the social anxiety. Good thing I live in a quiet part of relatively small town.
I really like this forum too, it is much more outsider-friendly than Russian forums that I used. I really hope my knowledge about mid-century LOMO and Carl Zeiss Jena microscopes may help the community.
Scopes: CZJ NfPk w/ 45mm apo objectives, Phv phase contrast, Epi Pol illuminator, trinocular head, CZJ Epityp-2 Pol (currently dismantled for full restoration and recollimation) w/ D32 microhardness tester and photomicrography attachment.

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Re: Mental struggles and microscopy

#16 Post by ScienceMatters » Tue Jan 19, 2021 8:52 pm

I know that the experiences of people with mental illnesses and their families are very diverse and, as our hugely respected member Apochronaut points out, the system can be so discouraging and ineffectual. I’m in the U.S. where health care can be very good or very bad, and there is always the tendency to throw medications at the problem.

But my first degree was in psychology and I worked in a mental health clinic for several years, and while some patients really struggled, some were really okay. I remember two Russian guys in particular who were related and had multiple diagnoses, and one of them was a favorite of mine — always so full of life, and he would make me laugh with his forceful greetings and charming demeanor. He was doing okay. His life appeared to me to be very much worth living! And others cared about him and were enriched by him in turn. So I know it is possible to live mostly successfully with mental illnesses. (And also to have a lonely, unhappy existence even without a mental illness.)

Patients have to be able to advocate for themselves and be very persistent in pursuing treatment that works for them. Medications can be necessary and very helpful as one part of a treatment program that also includes things like eating well, getting out for walks and exercising, and socializing, even though that can be the hardest thing for introverts.

What gives me much hope and optimism for you in particular, Dmi3n, is that you are clearly intelligent, articulate, appropriate in conversation, able to reach out and express your feelings, and you have some financial stability as well. Plus meaningful interests and career goals. These factors make you much more likely than average to be able to manage your illness. And you are very young still, only 20 years old, so it can get better from here as you learn tools to deal with it. Many things like anxiety, insomnia, and other peripheral issues that may come up for you can be effectively managed by coming up with a routine that includes self-soothing, breathing, relaxation and mindfulness techniques, distraction, etc. These tools really help if you find the right combination that works for you.

I’m pushing 50 and I have just recently hit upon an approach to quieting my anxieties and going to sleep at night that has become more effective than I ever imagined. (In a nutshell: mentally committing to putting aside my anxieties for the night and telling myself I can worry tomorrow; relaxing my jaw; focusing on slowing and deepening my breathing; and letting my mind drift while singing a comforting song to myself in my head.) I used to lay awake for hours and now, with discipline, I can fall asleep within 10-15 minutes as it has become an almost Pavlovian response to sleep once I go through the familiar ritual. My point is just to say that over time you can develop methods like this to help with some of your own struggles, and your youth makes this especially possible. Read and talk to others in your situation if you can. And don’t stop asking questions of your health care providers. The squeaky wheel gets the grease! Just my two cents.

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Re: Mental struggles and microscopy

#17 Post by Dmi3n » Wed Jan 20, 2021 8:13 am

ScienceMatters wrote:
Tue Jan 19, 2021 8:52 pm
I know that the experiences of people with mental illnesses and their families are very diverse and, as our hugely respected member Apochronaut points out, the system can be so discouraging and ineffectual. I’m in the U.S. where health care can be very good or very bad, and there is always the tendency to throw medications at the problem.

But my first degree was in psychology and I worked in a mental health clinic for several years, and while some patients really struggled, some were really okay. I remember two Russian guys in particular who were related and had multiple diagnoses, and one of them was a favorite of mine — always so full of life, and he would make me laugh with his forceful greetings and charming demeanor. He was doing okay. His life appeared to me to be very much worth living! And others cared about him and were enriched by him in turn. So I know it is possible to live mostly successfully with mental illnesses. (And also to have a lonely, unhappy existence even without a mental illness.)

Patients have to be able to advocate for themselves and be very persistent in pursuing treatment that works for them. Medications can be necessary and very helpful as one part of a treatment program that also includes things like eating well, getting out for walks and exercising, and socializing, even though that can be the hardest thing for introverts.

What gives me much hope and optimism for you in particular, Dmi3n, is that you are clearly intelligent, articulate, appropriate in conversation, able to reach out and express your feelings, and you have some financial stability as well. Plus meaningful interests and career goals. These factors make you much more likely than average to be able to manage your illness. And you are very young still, only 20 years old, so it can get better from here as you learn tools to deal with it. Many things like anxiety, insomnia, and other peripheral issues that may come up for you can be effectively managed by coming up with a routine that includes self-soothing, breathing, relaxation and mindfulness techniques, distraction, etc. These tools really help if you find the right combination that works for you.

I’m pushing 50 and I have just recently hit upon an approach to quieting my anxieties and going to sleep at night that has become more effective than I ever imagined. (In a nutshell: mentally committing to putting aside my anxieties for the night and telling myself I can worry tomorrow; relaxing my jaw; focusing on slowing and deepening my breathing; and letting my mind drift while singing a comforting song to myself in my head.) I used to lay awake for hours and now, with discipline, I can fall asleep within 10-15 minutes as it has become an almost Pavlovian response to sleep once I go through the familiar ritual. My point is just to say that over time you can develop methods like this to help with some of your own struggles, and your youth makes this especially possible. Read and talk to others in your situation if you can. And don’t stop asking questions of your health care providers. The squeaky wheel gets the grease! Just my two cents.
Wow, never thought I'd meet someone with a degree in psychology here! Thanks a lot for the kind words. When I was in mental health clinic in St. Petersburg we had some sort of lessons where we were told about relaxation and mindfulness techniques but I haven't mastered them yet. Guess it takes practice :)
Scopes: CZJ NfPk w/ 45mm apo objectives, Phv phase contrast, Epi Pol illuminator, trinocular head, CZJ Epityp-2 Pol (currently dismantled for full restoration and recollimation) w/ D32 microhardness tester and photomicrography attachment.

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Re: Mental struggles and microscopy

#18 Post by laisabeck » Mon Mar 15, 2021 5:30 am

Dmi3n wrote:
Sun Jan 17, 2021 9:49 pm
Some time ago I've been diagnosed with schyzotypal personality disorder.
My cousin has also been suffering from anxiety for the last 3 years after his wife died in a car accident. He avoids doctors out of a kind of fear of hospitals. He prefers yoga/meditation and herbal treatment. He is a kind of old-fashioned guy.

I want to ask, is it a case of schizotypal personality disorder, you mentioned above?
My friend's uncle suggested him to use CBD oil to deal with anxiety disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder. He ordered it through CbdMD coupons.

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Re: Mental struggles and microscopy

#19 Post by Dmi3n » Mon Mar 15, 2021 5:43 am

laisabeck wrote:
Mon Mar 15, 2021 5:30 am
Dmi3n wrote:
Sun Jan 17, 2021 9:49 pm
Some time ago I've been diagnosed with schyzotypal personality disorder.

I want to ask, is it a case of schizotypal personality disorder, you mentioned above?
Hello, I am no doctor by any means but this case looks more like post-traumatic stress disorder or anxiety disorder.
Scopes: CZJ NfPk w/ 45mm apo objectives, Phv phase contrast, Epi Pol illuminator, trinocular head, CZJ Epityp-2 Pol (currently dismantled for full restoration and recollimation) w/ D32 microhardness tester and photomicrography attachment.

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Re: Mental struggles and microscopy

#20 Post by laisabeck » Mon Mar 15, 2021 5:49 am

Okay. Thank you for reply!

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Re: Mental struggles and microscopy

#21 Post by Greg Howald » Mon Mar 15, 2021 12:01 pm

I have post traumatic stress disorder. This causes me to often seek isolation. I'm most comfortable when I am alone and able to avoid the feeling that I am being judged by others. Microscopy keeps me quite busy and this forum is an outlet for me. I am able here to learn from others and share my own experiences, so the forum is a joy for me. In all this it is important to me to let you know that although you are half way around the world, you are not alone, and your chosen hobby is quite engaging . I hope you are able to really enjoy it.
Greg

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Re: Mental struggles and microscopy

#22 Post by Red_Green » Mon Mar 15, 2021 2:21 pm

Anybody that judges others by there mental health conditions / health conditions / physical conditions, etc. Isn't worth having around. Life is too short for that kind of thing.

I personally have depression, social anxiety and trust issues. I've been suicidal for awhile now. I figure I am a lost cause.

I grew up poor, in poverty. I saved up all my life to go to college for a career. Went to college in 2019 for fish and wildlife technician program. Graduated with a diploma. So now I am a wildlife scientist. Or at least I am supposed to be. I am 37 now.

There's no jobs in science. None. So now I am 80+ in debt and I can't even get a job washing dishes. Let alone actually in my field. Which I have studied my whole entire life.
At 37, I am seriously close to running out of time for having kids, wife and family. Which scares the hell out of me.

Because there are no jobs I ended up homeless straight out of college. I still pretty much am.

So my mental state is pretty much f***ed.

I guess the point is, nobody knows where your coming from, nobody knows what your going through and nobody knows what you have been through. Nobody has the right to judge and everybody should be treated equally and with respect.


One hobby I have is microscopy and wildlife observation, which I post daily on Inaturalist. https://www.inaturalist.org/people/1768608

It's about all I have left in life.

Greg Howald
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Re: Mental struggles and microscopy

#23 Post by Greg Howald » Mon Mar 15, 2021 3:34 pm

Greg here.
I'm probably older than a lot of people on the forum at 72 years, and ice had to deal with this since my time in the service of the country. Long time. I know how it feels.

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zzffnn
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Re: Mental struggles and microscopy

#24 Post by zzffnn » Mon Mar 15, 2021 5:07 pm

I have a close friend with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and cancer, who inspires me significantly and changed how I perceived others and my own life. I myself had mild depression a few years back and have since learned about psychology.

Our brains know how to compensate; there is neurobiology base for that. What may seem to be our disadvantage, may actually become a talent and powerful driving force. We try our best to find that passion and follow it; it is a tough journey, but also a rewarding one after we shed sweat, tears and blood.

Olympic swimmer Michael Phelps has ADHD, but he turns his energy into swimming practice.

My friend is sometimes restless, but she is an amazing artists, painter and chef. And she turned her passion into a career, as art teacher (even though she was a nurse previously) and master naturalist for local children.

When I am stressed out by work (which happens a lot), I go to nature, photography, creativity and like-minded hobbyists. Outdoor / physical activities, such as kayaking, hiking, biking and weight lifting really help as well.

Photography itself has so many rabbit holes, anyone can find something there. Snowflakes, soap bubbles, soundwave, flowers, people, sports, landscape can all be beautiful subjects. When I photographed young couples holding their newborns, I felt and share their joy too.

I thought about volunteering at local zoo and animal shelters, because I like animals. Or maybe volunteering to teach local children about nature.

I go to local hobbyist clubs, such as those for birding, photography or kayaking. Those common interests make connecting with people more effortless. I found it easier to connect with inspiring friends, once I embraced my own uniqueness.

After all, if everyone in our society is normal , uptight and perfect, where can one find fun and creativity?

troy
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Joined: Thu May 13, 2021 5:22 pm

Re: Mental struggles and microscopy

#25 Post by troy » Sun May 16, 2021 9:36 am

Red_Green wrote:
Mon Mar 15, 2021 2:21 pm
I personally have depression, social anxiety and trust issues. I've been suicidal for awhile now. I figure I am a lost cause.
Many people in this world are struggling with life for health issues. So need not to worry and you are not alone in this world like this. All these are curable and can be cured by proper counselling or you can start doing regular Yoga and Meditation to come out of depression. However, I have read about the side effects of taking some pills or medicines on Canadian Pharmacy as they have some side effects also. Like foggy head and all.
I grew up poor, in poverty. I saved up all my life to go to college for a career. Went to college in 2019 for fish and wildlife technician program. Graduated with a diploma. So now I am a wildlife scientist. Or at least I am supposed to be. I am 37 now.
"Born in a poor family is not your fault" as Bill Gates quote.
At 37, I am seriously close to running out of time for having kids, wife and family. Which scares the hell out of me.
There is never a delay for a good start. I would suggest to find an understanding partner and start a new life.
One hobby I have is microscopy and wildlife observation, which I post daily on Inaturalist.
this is the best idea to keep yourself busy and once you will be busy there is no space for depression in your life.

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